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Long Beach HISTORIC LANDMARKS - 5

 

16.52.860 The Pressburg Residence. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following buildings as historical landmarks in the City: The Pressburg Residence, 167 South Street (Assessor's Parcel No. 7125030017). 

A. Specific Criteria. This house recalls the rural agricultural community that was its environment when it was built around 1905. This area then consisted of farms and was known as the California Cooperative Colony Tract. South Street was named for its southern boundary. Dairy Avenue was named after the old Bixby Dairy, later called the Long Beach Dairy, situated on what became 49 Ellis Street nearby. Subdivision into town lots began in 1922 along Long Beach Boulevard, which was not paved until 1927-28. North Long Beach was a separate city, called Virginia City, named after the Virginia Country Club. It was annexed to Long Beach by popular referendum in January, 1924. This house is located on the western City boundary that existed in the twenties. Records for this particular house are incomplete, for it was unincorporated land when it was constructed. It may have been part of the original Bixby farm and dairy, or it may have been moved onto its lot in 1930. However, this Victorian farmhouse is evocative of the area's rural beginnings. 

This house is an excellent example of Victorian architecture, with some idiosyncratic features. The steep gable roof, the large porch, the rich exterior textures of narrow clapboard siding and variegated shingles, are hallmarks of this style. The three-part second story window with a pointed gable, the use of shingles on the porch, and the use of diamond pane windows are all unusual features but are consistent with the rich visual variety of the Victorian era. 

It is one of the oldest homes in North Long Beach, and stands out from its neighbors in scale and architectural type. It is the only Victorian in the area. Its appearance as a rural farmhouse of the early 1900s amongst houses of later periods makes it an important historical artifact, recalling the California Cooperative Colony Tract of that early era. 

This two and one-half story late Victorian house stands out for its scale, its noteworthy architectural features, and its integrity. The cross gable roof is steeply pitched, and ends in gable returns. Within the gable are windows and richly ornate shingles: fishscale shingles alternate with diamond-pattern shingles, separated by square-cut shingles aligned in horizontal bands. The attic is indicated on the exterior by a projection cantilevered out from the vertical walls. The first story is separated by a plain frieze, below which the exterior cladding is narrow clapboards. A covered porch placed to one side is roofed in a low pitched closed gable forming a pediment. The front of the porch contains a wide arch spanning the entry steps; the sides contain two semi-circular arches. The porch exterior contains both narrow clapboards and fishscale shingles, separated by a narrow molding strip at the springing of the arch. The entry door is original, oak with a large oval glass. The windows are unusual features on this structure. The second floor facade contains a modified Palladian window, with the central portion shaped in a gable point rather than an arch. Inside the frame, paired double-hung windows are separated by a fixed pane narrow window with diamond-shaped muntins. The picture window on the first floor contains a wide double-hung window with two fixed pane side lights, also with diamond muntins. Other windows are double-hung wood sash, the frame capped with a lintel. There is a bay window on the east-facing side. The second story windows on this wall contain the only alteration on the building: aluminum sliders. There is a wooden picket fence of indeterminate age. The condition is good. 

16.52.870 The El Cordova/Rose Towers. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as a historical landmark in the City: The El Cordova/Rose Towers (Assessor's Parcel No. 7275013076-95). 

A. Specific Criteria. This fine example of Spanish Colonial Revival courtyard housing consists of twenty units of varied size and design, arranged as two separate wings facing a landscaped central corridor. A concrete meandering path traverses the courtyard, culminating in a tiled fountain set in a wall supporting a raised terrace in the rear. Twin stairs flanking the fountain lead up to this level. Twin iron lanterns are set on two posts. 

Although the building elements are symmetrical, particular motifs and details are varied. The design features exterior stairways, exterior balconies of wood and wrought iron, cantilevered second stories with plump embellished corbels, recessed entryways, pointed and parabolic arches, and decorative multi-color tile on stairs and window areas. Wood casement windows are deeply inset. The original tile roof is intact, but the exterior stucco has been redone in a coarse texture. The original hand-troweled surface finish is visible inside several entryways. An elaborate custom-crafted wrought iron signpost at the courtyard entry way contains a climbing rose vine. 

The building and landscaped courtyard are in excellent condition. Except for the exterior finish, there have been no alterations. The style of this complex, Spanish Colonial Revival, is typical for its period of construction (1928). However, the richness and variety of design motifs make this an outstanding example of that style. It is also significant as an example of courtyard housing, a housing type popular in the Twenties and Thirties for multi-family housing. Courtyard housing clustered the dwelling units around a landscaped open space area that was open to the street, providing a common and tranquil outdoor space for residents. The exterior walls framing the landscaped courtyard resemble an outdoor stage set for a picturesque village. Designed after models in Southern Spain where orientation around a central patio or courtyard was typical, they were often given romantic Spanish names. The original name of this building was El Cordova. This period also saw a big construction boom in apartment building in Long Beach. The builder and architect for this project contributed substantially to that construction boom. 

The Spanish Colonial Revival architecture is richly developed in this example. The arrangement of twenty units around a central landscaped courtyard has generated a great variety of Spanish Revival motifs: arches in round, pointed and Moorish shapes, recessed casement windows, French doors, wood balconies with turned posts, wrought iron balconies, decorative corbelling, multi-colored tile accents, exterior porches and stairs, and carved wooden doors. The walls are stucco and the terra cotta roof tile is stacked in layers, visually supported by extended wood rafters and wrought iron scroll brackets, A courtyard fountain has Spanish/Moorish tile and a statuette set into a niche. The fountain is set back into the rear of the courtyard and is framed by stairs which lead to an elevated patio. The courtyard and architecture are treated as a unified whole. The variety of levels, massing and architectural detailing evokes a romantic Spanish or Mediterranean village. 

George Riddle, the architect, and Monarch Construction, the contractor, were responsible for building many apartments in Long Beach in the late Twenties. They built other Spanish Colonial Revival courtyard apartments, and other types of housing. The high quality of their designs and the use of this housing type has significantly influenced the streetscape of Long Beach, particularly in this neighborhood, 

The neighborhood in which the El Cordova is located contains other examples of circa 1928 courtyard housing, creating a unified architectural theme. Other similar examples of the collaboration of George Riddle and Monarch Construction may be found at 1906 East First Street (The Barcelona); 2055 East Third Street (Casa Del Patio); 2075 East Third Street (Alvarado); 2074 East Third Street (Casa Nido). 

The picturesque charm of the El Cordova/ Rose Towers has enhanced its neighborhood for almost seventy years. The openness of the design, with the courtyard opening directly to the street, and the spaciousness of the courtyard, are visually distinctive features. The unity between architecture and landscaping also distinguish this building, 
 

16.52.890 The Bank of Belmont Shore. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following buildings as historical landmarks in the City: the Bank of Belmont Shore, 5354 East Second Street (Assessor's Parcel No. 7245002001). 

A. Specific Criteria. This building is one of the few early commercial structures on Second Street which has retained its original architectural character, and for which the succession of uses reflects a dynamic economic environment. Its Spanish Colonial Revival style harmonized with the predominant architectural style of the surrounding residential neighborhood. Originally constructed in 1929 as a restaurant for Mr. C.E. Patty, the architect/engineer was Ray A. Sites of Long Beach. Two other restaurants successively occupied this building until a major remodeling by Francis H. Gentry in 1950 was done for the Bank of Belmont Shore. The building as it is today is largely the product of this remodeling. Other bank uses followed: Coast Bank, and the Bank of San Diego, which closed in 1994. 

Francis H. Gentry, who designed the 1950 remodel for the Bank of Belmont Shore, made many important contributions to the City of Long Beach as a civil and structural engineer and as a civic leader. He partnered with Parker O. Wright on the design of the Scottish Rite and York Rite Masonic Temples (1926, 1927), both of which are designated historical landmarks. He served on the City Council as Mayor from 1939 to 1942. He also served on the Long Beach Civil Service Commission and County Sanitation District Boards; as food administrator 1943-45; as chairman of the Mayor's Food Conservation Committee 1947-48; and has been active in the affairs of the Long Beach hotel and restaurant industry. In 1943 he was commissioned as a Major, U.S. Army Reserve. He was a director of the Convention and Visitors Bureau and president of the Board of Trustees of the Second Presbyterian Church. He was a member of the Chamber of Commerce, Masons, Elks, and Native Sons of the Golden West. 

The building is also associated with Richard Loynes, Jr., who was listed as owner in 1938. Loynes was a world-famous speed boat racer and champion. From 1923 to 1933 he entered nearly every speedboat regatta in the country, becoming national champion three times, world champion twice, and held sixteen world records. In 1939, he skippered the yacht "Contender" from San Francisco to Honolulu to win the Golden Gate International Exposition trophy, and established another "first" by continuous radio broadcasts coast-to-coast from the yacht. He was twice president of the Long Beach Chamber of Commerce and chaired the City's first Marina Committee in 1956, the year of his death at age fifty-five. He was a past president of the State Shoreline Planning Association, a member of the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission and the Southern California Marine Radio Council. 

It is a typical example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, although it has been altered by later remodeling. As such, it exemplifies a style at the height of its popularity when it was constructed in 1929. Typical architectural features are the stucco walls, red tile roof, use of arched windows, and corner tower. 

Its design relates to the predominant architectural character of the residential neighborhood of Belmont Shore, Spanish Colonial Revival. It is one of the few commercial buildings on Second Street to retain its original architectural style. 

It represents an established and familiar visual feature of a neighborhood or community due to its unique location or specific distinguishing characteristics. 

Located at the southeast corner of Santa Ana and Second Street, this Spanish Colonial Revival commercial building, with its corner tower and red tile roof, has been a distinguishing landmark of its neighborhood for sixty-five years. The present design of the building has been established for forty-four years, with the rectangular corner tower and its scroll buttresses. Although remodeled for a succession of different businesses over the years, it has maintained a continuous presence amidst much demolition and new construction along Second Street. 

The building was constructed in 1929 as Patty's Restaurant. Its Spanish Colonial architecture harmonized with adjacent residential development during the first phase of building Belmont Shore. It was occupied by two other restaurants until 1950, when a major remodeling was done by Francis H. Gentry for the Bank of Belmont Shore. The building today looks largely as it did after Gentry's remodeling, although some additional modifications were made in 1986. 

This Spanish Colonial Revival commercial building consists of a single large rectangular hall with a corner tower; there is a covered porte cochere on the east side. Large arched windows face Second Street, with subdivided and radiating muntins. There are smaller square window openings on the side facade; a small balconet with wrought iron railing is on the second story on the side facade. The roof is red terra cotta tile; the walls are stucco. The side facade has been altered with rectangular relief strips framing the windows. The tower has a hipped roof and small arched windows, with curved brackets supporting a boxed cornice. The interior has been totally modernized; no historic fabric remains. 

This building is one of the few remaining structures on a busy commercial street to retain its original architectural character. Its style, Spanish Colonial Revival, references the adjacent residential neighborhood of Belmont Shore, developed primarily in the Twenties. The building has had a succession of uses, and remodeling, reflecting the dynamic commercial environment of Second Street. It was constructed originally as a restaurant for Mr. C. E. Patty. Construction plans are dated 1929, but the City directory listing doesn't appear until 1933; the Depression affected the opening of the business. By 1935, Patty's Restaurant was gone. 

The building has had a fascinating succession of uses, with construction drawings dated 1929 for Mr. C. E. Patty's Restaurant prepared by Ray A. Sites of Long Beach. City directories, however, first list this restaurant in 1933, but by 1935, the building was vacant. The next restaurant to occupy this space belonged to Louis Gersten, who lived with his wife Anna at 40 La Verne, a few blocks away. This business survived until 1945, when it became Irwin Schuman's restaurant; construction drawings show that an addition and alterations were done at this time. The 1948 directory lists Jack Laskey's restaurant. 

16.52.900 Castle Croydon. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, City Council designates the following building as a historical landmark in the City: Castle Croydon, 3000 East Seventh Street (Assessor's Parcel No. 7258030001). 

A. Specific Criteria. The structure is a mixed commercial and apartment structure at 3000 East Seventh Street. It is attached to a Craftsman bungalow, which has been modified to blend into the two-story commercial/apartment structure constructed subsequently. This latter structure has unique and novel architectural features depicting picturesque "castle" theme. There are several rounded turrets, crenelations, decorative roundels, a projecting chimney resting on corbels, scalloped archways, rounded archways, pierced decorative openwork and a Moorish horseshoe arch. Medieval Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival motifs are mixed. The exterior is stucco. Windows are metal casement with a separate subdivided transom. The corner entry to the ground floor commercial space is recessed at the corner, accessed through double doors, under a scalloped arch. A small-paned transom window is placed above the door. The ground floor storefronts have wood frames and transoms, and are original. A stucco wall incised to simulate stone connects the commercial structure to the Craftsman bungalow along Orizaba Street, and the bungalow has been stuccoed to blend. A concave stovepipe shape over the entry door to the Craftsman cottage echoes the fantasy theme. 

The Castle exemplifies typical patterns of land use and development for Long Beach during the 1920s. The two-story mixed-use structure was built in 1929 on Seventh Street as an addition to an older bungalow (1912) behind it on Orizaba Street. These two phases illustrate the transition from residential to commercial along Long Beach's major corridors. With ground floor retail shops and apartments above, the 1929 building was typical of mixed-use development of that era. The charming thematic architectural design was intended as a marketing tool of its period, attracting the eye of the motorist driving on Seventh Street. The use of medieval revival thematic design is unusual for a commercial structure. 

Period revivals were very popular in the 1920s as were exotic revivals and thematic buildings. Medieval Revival, Moorish Revival, Egyptian Revival, even "Hansel and Gretel" houses, flourished. Medieval Revival carried out with many embellishments characterizes this building. A few of the details derive from Spanish Colonial Revival designs, such as the use of red tile on the service tower, the wrought iron gate and the pierced grillework. The older bungalow at the rear contains typical Craftsman bungalow features, with unique convex hood over the doorway that ties in with the fantasy theme of the larger building. A stucco wall scored to simulate irregular cut stones links the Castle and the bungalow, consistent with the thematic architecture. 

Located on the corner of Seventh Street and Orizaba Street, this architectural fantasy is a unique and visually prominent feature of an otherwise bland, commercial corridor. The Medieval Revival motifs and architectural richness of this building make it stand out as a community and City landmark. 

This structure is significant also as an example of two phases in development: from residential to commercial. As the City's main transit corridors changed from residential to commercial uses, houses with commercial frontages along the street indicated this transition. The development of the Castle as an appendage to an older pre-existing bungalow exemplifies this transition along Seventh Street, and indicates the rapid pace of urban development in Long Beach in 1929. 

16.52.910 The Ernest and Lillian McBride Home. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as a historical landmark in the City: Ernest and Lillian McBride Home, 1461 Lemon Avenue (Assessor's Parcel No. 7268-021-034). 

A. Specific Criteria. This site has been the home of Ernest and Lillian McBride, civil rights pioneers in Long Beach, since 1948 to the date of this Ordinance. This site was the second home purchased by an African-American person in that neighborhood, a conscious defiance of restrictive covenants in the real estate market. Ernest McBride was a co-founder of the Long Beach Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and served as its secretary. The McBrides held many Long Beach Chapter NAACP meetings at this home. This site is associated with a long and successful campaign to advance the civil rights movement in Long Beach. 

This neighborhood was the focus of the first efforts at residential desegregation in Long Beach. After the McBrides purchased their house, and after restrictive covenants were declared illegal by the Supreme Court, other African-Americans began to follow them in obtaining residences in the area. Today the neighborhood is occupied by a majority of African-American residents. The group of single-story bungalows on the 1400 block of Lemon Avenue, well-kept and small-scale, have retained their fundamental appearance, integrity and character that existed when Mr. and Mrs. McBride moved there in 1948. 

The site contains a single-family one-story remodeled Craftsman bungalow built in 1919 (1461 Lemon Avenue), plus a two-story structure fourplex at the rear (1463 Lemon Avenue). The bungalow remodeling consists of exterior stucco, replacement of porch supports with iron rails, replacement of the picture window on the facade. The scale and character of the structure at 1461 Lemon Avenue is consistent with others on the street. The building is not architecturally significant. 

16.52.920 The Dolly Varden Hotel Rooftop Sign. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following object as an historical landmark in the City: The Dolly Varden Hotel Rooftop Sign. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 335 Pacific Avenue, the Dolly Varden Hotel Rooftop Sign consists of two panels of neon lettering, each positioned in a diagonal on the front of the roof and joined at the corners in the shape of a "V". The sign reads: "DOLLY VARDEN HOTEL...BATH IN EVERY ROOM". The top panel is shaped in a basic "T"-form with the words "Dolly Varden" forming the top bar of the "T", and "Hotel" the bottom section. The outline is irregular, with a flattened peak at the top. The words "Bath In Every Room" are located on a bar shape slightly below the top panel. The sign panels are elevated by supporting steel struts. The sign letters are in block capitals with a serif. They are made of neon for nighttime illumination. 

The Dolly Varden Rooftop Sign is placed atop a rectangular, nondescript apartment hotel constructed in 1929. The building is not architecturally significant, nor does it have an identifiable architectural style. However, the rooftop sign is a vintage historical object, notable for its period design and for the charming and nostalgic message displayed. It is a visual landmark in the downtown. City permits do not exist for the sign, but based on stylistic inference, it appears to be a product of the `thirties. Building permits for post-earthquake repairs were taken out in August 1933, including work on the roof; one could surmise that the sign was erected at that time. 

The sign recalls a time when apartment hotels without amenities were common in the downtown. It is the only historic sign which contains an advertising message in addition to the name of the facility. It is a visually prominent feature both during the daytime and at night because of its neon. Its design and materials embody a typical "thirties" stylistic character. 

The sign and the message on the sign on the roof of the Dolly Varden Hotel evoke the nostalgic flavor of Long Beach's past. The unique feature of this rooftop sign is the addition of a commercial message to the name of the hotel; this neon advertisement was placed on two diagonal positions to catch the attention of travelers from both directions. It is an example or roadside vernacular design, similar to Route 66 artifacts and early examples of creative roadside commercial signage. It is also a reminder of Long Beach's prominence as a beach resort town, with profusion of small hotels close to the beachfront. 

Dolly Varden's obituary paints a portrait of a colorful and eccentric person, a circus performer who hoarded jewels. She apparently did not live in Long Beach, but apparently had an admirer in Long Beach. The name Dolly Varden also belongs to a character in a Dickens' novel, "Barnaby Rudge". The name of the original owner who built the hotel was L.F. Dolly. 

The silhouette and shape of the sign, the typeface of the letters, the use of neon and metal supporting struts, are all typical of `thirties signs. This is a vintage neon sign, exemplifying the commercial benefits of colorful, illuminated signage. Neon became a very popular sign material in the `thirties. 

The Dolly Varden has been a prominent visual feature of downtown Long Beach for sixty years and is regarded affectionately by many residents and visitors. Its distinctive visual qualities and charming message enhance the ambience of the downtown streetscape. 

16.52.930 The Le Grande Apartments. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: The Le Grande Apartments. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 635 East 9th Street, this is a two-story, 20 unit courtyard apartment designed in the Chateauesque style. This style became popular in Southern California in the `twenties and appeared occasionally in apartment buildings in Long Beach at that time. The design is asymmetrical, with the entry under a projecting Romanesque portal of triple attached columns and a series of arches decorated with geometric motifs. The upper portion has flattened decorative corbels. The wrought iron gate has a series of arches, echoing the curves of the portal. The courtyard is landscaped, and exterior stairs lead to the upper units. There is a mansard roof, turrets, and partial dormers. Multipaned wood sash windows are used. The exterior stucco is strongly textured in curves, giving a hand-troweled appearance. 

This courtyard apartment building was constructed during a period of very rapid growth for the City that had been stimulated by a strong demand for rental housing in a fast-growing economy. The `twenties were boom years in Long Beach, due in part to the new oil industry, but also to the flourishing beach resort economy, and business and industrial growth. The type of housing represented here served working class people. The architectural charm and picturesque quality must have been an attempt to give this building a competitive edge in an expanding housing market. 

This building is an excellent example of the Medieval Revival Chateauesque style, which was popular in this period. In the years following the first World War, exposure to European castles resulted in Chateauesque Revival buildings. Long Beach has other examples built at this time, such as the Lowena Historic District and the Gaytonia. The architectural type represented here is courtyard housing, which was a popular form of housing in Southern California from approximately 1915-1935. Two stories of living units are arrayed in parallel wings around a central landscaped courtyard, screened from the street by a Romanesque Revival portal and decorative entry gate. The use of exterior stairs and varied massing conveys the quality of a miniature townscape to the complex. 

16.52.940 The Silver Bow Apartments. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: The Silver Bow Apartments. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 330 Cedar Avenue, this three-story red and tan brick apartment building was built in 1915. This building is significant as an intact Renaissance Revival apartment building, of high quality materials and design, from any early period in Long Beach's history (1915). The architect was F.L. Lindsay, whose office was at 171 Locust in Long Beach; the original client was Alex Husband. Construction drawings for post-earthquake repairs in 1933 show reconstruction and repair according to the original plans, rather than a modernization. The repairs were designed by Harvey Lochridge, a local and prominent structural engineer. The facade has finely detailed masonry construction, with molding and panels defined by contrasting patterns of glazed tan brick. The prominent cornice, with large dentils and paired brackets, is original. The brackets are detailed in Classical Revival style. White accents are provided by the cornice, horizontal molding between the stories, and central balconies. The symmetrical facade has a recessed central doorway with recessed spaces and balconies above. The balconies have decorative iron railings and a fire escape ladder. The entry door has two side lights. The entry stairs and hallway are white marble. The windows are tripartite, the central panel containing a transom and the two narrower side windows double-hung. Seismic reinforcing anchor bolts are visible on the side plain red brick walls, where the windows have segmented arches. 

This three-story apartment building today is one of the earliest masonry apartment buildings in the City, constructed in 1915. At the time it was built, it was a major residential structure in its neighborhood, which consisted primarily of smaller scale wood frame dwellings. Today it stands out as one of the oldest surviving brick apartment buildings in Long Beach, most of which were constructed in the Twenties. It is a precursor to the expansion of high rise residential apartment construction in Long Beach in the decade of the Twenties. 

The building's Renaissance Revival style had features that later became typical of Long Beach three-story apartment buildings. The facade is symmetrical, with the central entryway placed in a recessed bay. Second and third story balconies overlook the street. The clear demarcation of each story and each bay, the prominent classical cornice crowning the roof, the detailing of the facade brickwork, the white decorative accents against a brick background, are hallmarks of the Renaissance Revival style. The style of the windows reference another contemporary residential style: Craftsman, with tripartite windows and use of a transom in the central pane. 

This building relates to the Willmore City Historic District just adjacent to its north, by era of construction and building type. It also relates to adjacent historic buildings at the corner of Third Street and Cedar Avenue: the First Congregational Church (1914) and the Willmore (1924). 

The building has a monumental presence on the street due to its scale, materials and design. Its name is displayed in large-scale letters over the entryway. It is a visual landmark, having survived unchanged for eighty years. 

16.52.950 Casa Aitken. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following object as an historical landmark in the City: Casa Aitken. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 725 East Eighth Street, this two-story Spanish Colonial Revival fourplex has a U-shape around an interior courtyard located at the side of the building along the alley. An exterior staircase leading up from the patio makes two angled turns to become an exterior stucco balcony with shaped wood supports. There is an ornamental pool with multicolored tile in the courtyard attached to the building. Several of the large windows are made of stained glass. A few of the smaller windows have been replaced with modern sliders. There is a shaped cornice under the roof tiles for the wing on Eighth Street. The original stucco exterior and roof tiles have been maintained. The condition is good. 

This four-unit building was constructed in 1932, during the Depression, and prior to the Long Beach earthquake. This was a period in which construction activity was very slow; Long Beach does not have many examples of building construction in 1932. The housing market was still viable, and the quality of the design and materials indicates the continuing demand for well-designed, multi-family, middle-class residences in the City. 

The Spanish Colonial Revival architectural style was at its peak of fashion in the early Thirties. This example is richly detailed, with many features exemplifying the full flowering of this style: the exterior balcony with its turned woodwork, accessed by an exterior tiled stair; wood corbelled supports; stucco walls and terra cotta tile roof; some stained glass windows; and particularly the multicolored tile fountain in the courtyard. 

The architectural type represented here is courtyard housing, with dwelling units arranged around a central courtyard, often with a fountain as the visual focal point. This housing type was popular in Southern California from approximately 1915-1935, and was associated with the romance of Southern Spain. This example is half of a full courtyard, with a U-shaped configuration surrounding a courtyard containing a Spanish/Moorish colored tile fountain. 

B. The Secretary of the Interior's "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" are incorporated by reference, and shall serve as standards and guidelines for future exterior changes to the building. All exterior changes, whether or not they require a building permit, shall require a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Cultural Heritage Commission. Any exterior alterations, modifications or repair of the structure shall be consistent with the character-defining architectural features, and shall not adversely affect the historical materials, design or detailing. (Ord. C-7381 § 1, 1996). 

16.52.960 St. John's Missionary Baptist Church. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: St. John's Missionary Baptist Church. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 741 East Tenth Street, this simplified Gothic Revival church is notable for its magnificent stained glass windows. Two large stained glass windows with a segmental arch occupy the main facades; they are subdivided vertically by wood framing near the sides and a curved transom at the top. The wall surface has two spaced pilasters on each side of the window. The nave and transept are treated similarly on the exterior, as rectangular shapes terminating in a peaked ogee arch. A rectangular corner tower is slightly recessed along Tenth Street where the entry door is placed. The top is shaped as a flattened pointed arch on each side above cutaway corners. The tower contains elongated rectangular windows and a large vent on each side with a segmented arch top. The exterior material is concrete. A blade sign shaped to echo the architectural forms contains the name of the church, and appears to be contemporary or nearly so. The condition is good. 

This large-scale church is a significant architectural monument in its neighborhood, and is a notable visual landmark. It is particularly significant for its large and richly designed stained glass windows. 

The history of this monumental historical church reveals the strength and cultural importance of religious organizations in the history of Long Beach. The building was constructed by the First Church of the Nazarene, which was founded in Long Beach in 1905. The Church purchased the site in 1919 and constructed the building in 1923, using the building for religious and community purposes until 1956. Earthquake damage to the church in 1933 was repaired and the building restored. Among their most popular activities was a radio broadcast known as `The Little Church of the Fireside", launched in 1947. The congregation continued to grow and moved into a larger building which they constructed at 5253 Los Coyotes Diagonal in 1960. The existing building at Tenth and Olive was purchased by St. John Baptist Church, which had been founded in 1949 as a Bible study group. They were formally established as a church in 1952 and moved into the church building in 1958. The Church has a major educational mission. The people associated with the formal establishment of a church in the community and those who served as pastors may all be considered significant to the community. For the Nazarene Church, the founding evangelist was W. C. Wilson, who organized the Church in 1905 and served twice as its pastor. During the pastorate of Rev. J. I. Hill from 1919 to 1924, the subject church building was constructed. Rev. J. E. Williams served as pastor there from 1929 to 1940 and established the radio broadcast program. The twelve founders of St. John Missionary Baptist Church were: John S. Grigsby, Malissa Green, Willa Connor, Palmer Dickson, Sam Wilks, William Atwater, Lola Atwater, Rufus Harris, Robert Hill, Jewel Hill, Jennie Mae Whitfield and R. B. White. The first pastor was Rev. S. Noble; the current pastor is Dr. Ralph J. Mosby, Jr. 

The style of this building is Gothic Revival, a style traditionally in favor with church architecture in America because of its long European heritage associated with medieval cathedrals. The early years of the Twenties in Southern California saw the proliferation of "period revival" styles in architecture. Particularly outstanding in this building are the monumental stained glass windows, one appearing on each facade of the corner-sited building. 

Typical of church architecture is the monumental scale, the impressive and architecturally elaborate facades, and the use of a tower, in this example a single corner tower. 

This building has been part of its residential neighborhood for more than seventy years and is a visual landmark in the neighborhood due to its scale and magnificent stained glass. Its corner siting enhances its visual prominence. 

16.52.970 The James Beer Residence. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: The James Beer Residence. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 1503 East Ocean Boulevard, The James Beer Residence is a two-and-a-half-story single-family residence, Mission Revival in style. The exterior is light grey pebbly concrete; the roof is composition. Extended rafter tails support wide eaves. The main mass of the house is intersected by a transverse mass centrally placed in the facade, containing a recessed porch and picture window above. Tall curvilinear gables accented with molding to highlight the outline rise above the pitched roof at each of the gable ends, with a lower one in the rear. Inside the two side gables is a quatrefoil inset with a small square window. The windows are Craftsman in type, with divided light transoms. Each window has a label molding above and a plan lintel below. There are several square bays and subsidiary shed roofs breaking up the massing. The deep recessed porch has a decorative wrought iron gate which extends around the west side of the house on top of a low concrete retaining wall. A similar low concrete wall on the east side is plain. The porch pillars have strap molding in place of capitals, with a central dentil on each side of the molding. A landscaped pergola extends the porch on the west side. The three steps leading to the porch have curved corners. Inside, wood beams are visible on the ceiling. There is a large garage and second-story unit accessory structure at the rear facing the side street. 

This house was constructed in 1912 and is one of the oldest original residences remaining in place on this section of Ocean Boulevard, west of Bluff Park Historic District. It is one of the few remaining Mission Revival style buildings in the City; two others identified to date are a residence in Carroll Park, and the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot. Many Mission Revival buildings had been built here in the early years of this century, but many were destroyed in the 1933 earthquake or demolished over the years. The first owner, and probable builder, was contractor J. C. Beer, who lists his occupation as building contractor. He lived across Ocean Boulevard at 1400 until 1914 when he moved to this house, at that time the address being 1403 East Ocean. His office was at the Long Beach Pleasure Pier. He lived at this address through the Twenties. The James Beer Residence recalls the early history of Long Beach when homes were first constructed on prime lots along Ocean Boulevard. Its architectural style, Mission Revival, is also a rare historical survivor, recalling a style that was popular in Southern California from 1905 to 1915. Many early photographs of homes, schools, churches and hotels show the popularity of Mission Revival. However, almost all examples of this style in Long Beach are gone today. This building recalls the lost architecture of an earlier period. The Mission Revival's most distinctive feature was the curvilinear gable, derived from Mission churches. The exterior material was stucco or concrete, reflecting adobe prototypes. Other typical features were cubic massing, square piers, and simple unadorned surfaces. When ornament was used, it was Spanish Baroque in character, such as the quatrefoil in the gable. Often, Craftsman features were mixed in, such as the protruding rafter tails supporting the roof and the window type with subdivided transom lights. 

The James Beer Residence is part of the evolution of residential development along Ocean Boulevard, the City's premier residential location. It represents the first phase of construction, which consisted of large single-family homes on prime lots with ocean views. 

16.52.980 The Garvey House. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: The Garvey House. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Constructed between 1904 and 1906 and located at 2718 East Seventh Street, the Garvey House is a two and one-half-story Victorian with all of its original features intact. It has a steep cross-gable roof with pendant trefoil ornament on the gable edges. The gable ends are slightly flared, and the roof edges wrap partially around the corners. There is a skirt roof at the midpoint of the gable and fishscale shingles above. The corner porch is recessed and supported by slender Doric columns. The picture window adjacent is tripartite with a fixed center pane and two side casements. The transom has narrow vertical muntins ending in a pointed arch; this same motif is found in the upper panes of many windows on the house. The casements have similar muntin patterns with a diamond shape in the center. The front entry door is paneled with a large oval pane of beveled glass. The small hall window has the pointed arch ornate muntin pattern. On the east side is a shallow bay, containing three windows, again with the ornate upper panes. The facade has a second-story balcony with brackets and ornate turned rails in a central panel. Rear decks on both floors are enclosed by intricate cut-out patterned rails. The exterior is clad in narrow shiplap siding. All the windows and doors have wide board frames. There is also an original barn and carriage house in the rear, and vintage gaslight fixtures. The interior contains its original floor plan, a stair with ornate baluster, and an ornate, baroque-inspired fireplace. Later additions include a fenced enclosure on the west, picket fences and a picket archway on the east, and a jacuzzi pavilion. 

The historic value of this house is that it represents the first phase of residential settlement in the City of Long Beach, in the first decade of this century, when the rate of population growth was six hundred ninety percent, the highest in the Nation. Residential development along Seventh Street was just beginning in the early 1900s. Very few of the first homes built on Seventh Street survive today on this commercial thoroughfare. This home is one of the best preserved early homes on Seventh Street, and one of the finest examples of Victorian architecture in the City. The trefoil pendants and rich window detailing are unusual features in Long Beach Victorians, which generally are simple and austere. 

B. Rationale for Historic Landmark Designation. In accordance with the provisions of Section 2.63.050 of this Code, the City Council finds that the following reasons exist relative to the designation of the Garvey House as an historic landmark: 

    1. The Garvey House possesses a significant character, interest and value attributable to the development, heritage and cultural characteristics of the City, the Southern California region, and the State of California. The house is one of the only remaining Victorian homes surviving on Seventh Street. Its continued presence on the street denotes the first residential construction in the area, most of which has to date disappeared. The location of the house indicates the patterns of residential settlement when Long Beach was a young city, with homes dispersed over a wide area several miles from downtown. This Victorian house is one of the larger-scale early residences in the City. 

    2. The Garvey House portrays the environment in an era of history characterized by its distinctive architectural style. The house is an excellent and well-preserved example of Victorian architecture, with gothic revival features. Its steeply pitched roof, slender porch columns with ornate capitals, elaborate window mullions, narrow clapboard siding, and decorative shingles under the gable, are all typical Victorian features. 

    3. The Garvey House embodies those distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type or engineering specimen. The house has typical features of the Victorian dwelling: a steep roof containing an attic, an off-set front porch at one corner, windows with tall proportions, enriched surface textures and details. The use of jigsaw decorative ornament, found on the roof eves and deck railings is also typical of the Victorian fascination with using machines to intricately cut and turn wood. The house is solid redwood construction. In addition, the accessory structures are reminders of the Victorian era. The carriage house and barn still exist in their original condition behind the house. The carriage house has raised tracks on the floor for the wheels of the carriage and the barn has a hayloft for the horse, and the original barn doors.

C. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the United States Secretary of the Interior (Revised, 1991), as amended, as well as the "Procedures for Administering the Certificate of Appropriateness" found in Section 2.63.070 of this Code are incorporated herein by this reference. The guidelines are to be used as standards for the Cultural Heritage Commission in making decisions about Certificates of Appropriateness as required by Chapter 2.63 of this Code. The guidelines are an aid to property owners and others formulating plans for new construction, for rehabilitation or alteration of an existing structure, and for site development. The goal of the Certificate of Appropriateness review is to retain and preserve all original architectural materials and design features; to encourage rehabilitation which restores original historic fabric rather than remodels; and to ensure architectural compatibility between new and old. 

D. Standards and Guidelines. 

    1. Changes requiring a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Cultural Heritage Commission are as follows: 
      a. Alterations or additions to roof; change in roof materials. 
      b. Additions. 
      c. Alterations to structure including foundation. 
      d. Alterations to windows. 
      e. Changes to doors and doorways. 
      f. Changes to exterior materials or colors. 
      g. Relocation of exterior walkways or driveways. 
      h. Alteration or addition to fencing and exterior patio walls.
16.52.990 The Bay Hotel. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: The Bay Hotel. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Constructed in 1924 and located at 318 Elm Avenue, the Bay Hotel is a rectangular three-story brick building with penthouse, Italian Renaissance in style. It contains retail storefronts at the ground floor and two floors of residential units above. The roof is flat. The facade is divided into three bays; the central bay with five evenly-spaced rectangular window openings and the side bays one-window wide. The side bays contain two-story arches, each composed of radiating brick with keystones and terra cotta columns. Within the arches is a semicircle of decorative terra cotta tile at the top, followed by a window, then a three foot by four foot grid of decorative terra cotta tile and another window at the bottom. The decorative tile has a matte finish with muted tones of green, cream and coral. The midpoint above the top windows has an inset circle. The facade brick is golden colored and textured with brick bands marking each story. The sides and rear are common brick with ghosted signage. The four ground-floor storefronts have large plate glass show windows with recessed glass doors. The bulkheads are ceramic tile, overpainted. There is a wide opaque glass transom with panels divided by turned wood posts. Above the transom runs a frieze, ornamented with decorative polychrome terra cotta, repeated in side pilasters framing the outside perimeter of the storefronts. The windows are double hung, multi-paned wood sash. There is a fire escape on the two northern-most windows of the central bay. 

The exterior is intact and unaltered except for a chopped-off cornice line, the result of post-1933 earthquake repairs. Original drawings show a tile-covered shed roof between two low-side towers. The original steel casement windows have been recently replaced with double-hung wood sash multi-paned windows as part of a recent rehabilitation and seismic upgrade. 

The building was constructed as a "Bachelor Hotel", with thirty small-size units on the second and third floors arranged around a central light court. There were central shared bathroom facilities, and a two-room penthouse for the manager at the top. The original drawings dated 1924 were signed by contractor T. S. Shutt, whose office was at 140 Bonito in Long Beach. A building listed as Shutt Building Apartments was located at 401 1/2 East Third Street and 308 Elm Avenue. Construction drawings in City Hall microfiche files also show earthquake repairs, presumably after the 1933 earthquake with the name of Gilbert Stanley Underwood, architect, written in at 101 American Avenue. However, City directories do not confirm this. 

The building is significant as an intact example of mixed-use residential apartment hotel combined with ground-floor storefronts, a building type common in the 1920s. Architecturally, it is a very good example of Renaissance Revival design with fine facade brickwork and extra detailing such as the inset arches and decorative polychrome terra cotta. It is unusual to have the original storefronts and transoms perfectly preserved. 

B. Rationale for Historic Landmark Designation. In accordance with the provisions of Section 2.63.050 of this Code, the City Council finds that the following reasons exist relative to the designation of the Bay Hotel as an historic landmark: 

    1. The Bay Hotel possesses a significant character, interest or value attributable to the development, heritage or cultural characteristics of the City, the Southern California region and the State of California. In addition to its architectural features, the Bay Hotel functioned as a "working mens" house and is evidence of the economic boom of Long Beach in the early 1920s, in part the result of the Signal Hill oil strike. Many jobs were created in the oil fields, as well as in other parts of a booming local economy. The use of the Bay Hotel has remained consistent over seven decades. While there are other examples of mixed use projects remaining in downtown Long Beach, the Bay Hotel is architecturally the most distinguished. 

    2. The Bay Hotel portrays the environment in an era of history characterized by its distinctive architectural style. The Renaissance Revival style is carried out in composition and in detailing. The facade is divided into a base, mid-section and cornice. It is also divided into three bays, with five evenly-spaced rectangular windows in the central bay, flanked by arches in the side bays. Each section is clearly articulated with marked divisions. Panels of terra cotta ornament, geometric and foliate in design, are placed in the frieze above the transom windows, the pilasters at the ground floor corners, and around the windows in the arched sections. The facade brickwork is gold textured brick, while common red brick is used for the side and rear walls. 

    3. The Bay Hotel embodies those distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type or engineering specimen. The hotel exemplifies the major characteristics of a Renaissance Revival mixed use building, including its original storefronts which have never been remodeled. 

    4. The Bay Hotel is part of or related to a distinctive feature and should be developed or preserved according to a specific historic, cultural or architectural motif. The Bay Hotel was part of the downtown residential district of the 1920s, which produced apartments, single-room occupancy buildings as well as elegant apartment hotels in Long Beach. As a brick apartment building over commercial storefronts, it is similar to the Broadlind Hotel, the Kennedy Hotel and others. The historical theme is housing patterns of the 1920s.

C. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the United States Secretary of the Interior (Revised, 1991), as amended, as well as the "Procedures for Administering the Certificate of Appropriateness" found in Section 2.63.070 of this Code are incorporated herein by this reference. The guidelines are to be used as standards for the Cultural Heritage Commission in making decisions about Certificates of Appropriateness as required by Chapter 2.63 of this Code. The guidelines are an aid to property owners and others formulating plans for new construction, for rehabilitation or alteration of an existing structure, and for site development. The goal of the Certificate of Appropriateness review is to retain and preserve all original architectural materials and design features; to encourage rehabilitation which restores original historic fabric rather than remodels; and to ensure architectural compatibility between new and old. 

D. Standards and Guidelines. 

    1. Changes requiring a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Cultural Heritage Commission are as follows: 
      a. Alterations or additions to roof; change in roof materials. 
      b. Additions. 
      c. Alterations to structure including foundation. 
      d. Alterations to windows. 
      e. Changes to doors and doorways. 
      f. Changes to exterior materials or colors. 
      g. Signage.
16.52.1000 The Ringheim/Wells House. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the City: The Ringheim/Wells House. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Constructed in 1907-08 and located at 4031 East Fifth Street, the Ringheim/Wells House is one of the first residences constructed in its neighborhood in southeast Long Beach. The land was mapped in 1888 as the Alamitos Beach Townsite, and the subdivision of the block was recorded as Brown's Tract in 1904. The first owner was Sarah K. Ringheim. A two and one-half story Victorian, with steeply pitched cross gable roof, the house was built at a time when the Victorian style was passing out of favor and replaced by Craftsman style architecture. The house shows the survival of conservative architectural styles in Long Beach and its location demonstrates a dispersed pattern of residential settlement when the City was young. In 1907, the location of the house was outside of the City limits. The City experienced its largest surge in population in the decade 1900 through 1910, and the survival today of the Ringheim/Wells House in its outlying location is a reminder of the tremendous growth of Long Beach at that time. The house is clad in narrow shiplap siding which extends down to the ground and to the porch wall. The attic story is faced with fishscale shingles, which are graduated in size above the vent. A horizontal molding strip runs from the porch rail under the windows and around the house. On the front, a pair of double-hung windows with shutters are placed in the center of the second story. All the windows are wood sash double-hung, with a wide board surround. The entry door has a large pane of glass and two side lights extending down two-thirds of the door height. The front porch, five steps up, is offset to one side, balanced by a bay window on the other side. A second bay window is placed on the west wall, so that the living room has two bay windows. The porch is supported by paired Corinthian columns. A plain frieze under the porch roof connects to the front bay window. The cornice is boxed and the eaves extend around the corners. The roof material is composition. A second smaller house was added in the rear yard in 1923 and a garage was constructed in 1929. There is a white picket fence on the property line, and the interior of the house is largely intact and original. Overall, the condition of the home is excellent. 

B. Rationale for Historic Landmark Designation. In accordance with the provisions of Section 2.63.050 of this Code, the City Council finds that the following reasons exist relative to the designation of the Ringheim/Wells House as an historic landmark: 

    1. The Ringheim/Wells House possesses a significant character, interest or value attributable to the development, heritage and cultural characteristics of the City, the Southern California region, and the State of California. The Ringheim/Wells House is significant as an outstanding example of Victorian architecture in Long Beach, and shows a continuing popularity of an older architectural tradition in this community where Victorians continued to be built during the first decade of the 1900s. The house also illustrates the early widely disbursed patterns of settlement in the Long Beach area, outside of the City limits. The house is the largest Victorian in the neighborhood, and is one of the first homes constructed in the area. The house was constructed in 1907-08 and has been occupied continuously since that time, but has retained its original architectural integrity. It is one of the oldest and most monumental homes in the neighborhood. 

    2. The Ringheim/Wells House portrays the environment in an era of history characterized by its distinctive architectural style. The house is an excellent and intact example of Victorian architecture, which was prevalent in Long Beach from the 1880s through the early 1900s. It has all of the characteristics of the Victorian style: a high profile with tall, narrow proportions; steep cross gable roof with boxed fascia; an offset front porch with decorative columns; bay windows; narrow clapboard siding and fishscale shingle cladding.

C. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the United States Secretary of the Interior (Revised, 1991), as amended, as well as the "Procedures for Administering the Certificate of Appropriateness" found in Section 2.63.070 of this Code are incorporated herein by this reference. The guidelines are to be used as standards for the Cultural Heritage Commission in making decisions about Certificates of Appropriateness as required by Chapter 2.63 of this Code. The guidelines are an aid to property owners and others formulating plans for new construction, for rehabilitation or alteration of an existing structure, and for site development. The goal of the Certificate of Appropriateness review is to retain and preserve all original architectural materials and design features; to encourage rehabilitation which restores original historic fabric rather than remodels; and to ensure architectural compatibility between new and old. 

D. Standards and Guidelines. 

    1. Changes requiring a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Cultural Heritage Commission are as follows: 
      a. Alterations or additions to roof; change in roof materials. 
      b. Additions. 
      c. Alterations to structure including foundation. 
      d. Alterations to windows. 
      e. Changes to doors and doorways. 
      f. Changes to exterior materials or colors. 
      g. Changes to exterior walkways or driveways. 
      h. Alteration or addition to fencing.
16.52.1010 The Kale House and attached Music Art Hall. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following buildings as historical landmarks in the City: The Kale House and attached Music Art Hall. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Constructed in 1907 and located at 853 Linden Avenue, the Kale House was constructed by owner and builder W. S. Kale in an eclectic and unique architectural style. The house combines Victorian, Craftsman and Prairie features. The plaster exterior and sand finish is original. The main entrance on Linden Avenue is set off by a centrally placed projecting front porch with flattened arches continuing into wide pier supports, and a flat roof. A second-story door accesses the roof as a balcony. A second-story round tower with conical roof is placed at the corner; it is supported by wood brackets and has a series of double-hung windows with paired semicircular arches in mirror image in the upper pane. A series of three windows similar in design to the tower, but wider, forms a bay at the corner of the first floor. The front porch is asymmetrical and extends under the corner tower as an open patio with low retaining wall. A composition truncated hip roof is placed over the house, and the whole roof has exposed extended rafter tails. Windows are wide, framed with wood with finely detailed molding. Many windows have the opposed semicircular pattern of muntins in the transom, in various dimensions. South of the porch, the picture window is shaped as a flattened arch with three-part transom, with small opposed semicircles in the center. Above is a Craftsman-style tripartite window with fixed center pane containing the semicircles in the transom, and narrow double-hung windows on both sides. The front door is a Craftsman type with square panes, three over three. On the Ninth Street side, a tapered chimney is pierced by a window on the first floor. A small addition of a bathroom and closet from 1941 is found on the south side facing Linden Avenue. A one-story passageway with vertical siding links the house to the assembly hall at 440 East Ninth Street. 

The attached Music Art Hall at 440 East Ninth Street was originally constructed in 1936 and later became known as the Alford Arts Academy. As the size of the hall was equivalent to a small-scale single-family house, the hall blended easily into the residential neighborhood. During its history, two different religious organizations occupied the hall: first the Church of Religious Science, then Temple Beth-El. The mix of residential, artistic and religious institutional uses of the building over the years has contributed positively to the cultural life of the neighborhood and the City. The hall is clad in plaster and has a gable roof, the edge of which is framed by a frieze. Its symmetrical facade is dominated by an arched entryway framed by pilasters and molded arch trim, articulated by column bases at the springing of the arch. The semicircular door is recessed behind a decorative wrought iron gate, with glass fanlight and a row of rectangular windows in the door. A square window with detailed wide molding is placed above the door. Two large, tall narrow windows with no exterior framing are slightly inset on each side of the entry. The interior contains a wood floor, a stage, and an elaborate wood truss system of shaped exposed beams under the roof. 

Both the Kale House and the attached Music Art Hall have a unique history and significance in the City. William S. Kale, original owner and builder, spent more than twice the usual cost of building the single-family house; the cost was four thousand five hundred dollars as compared with the usual building cost of from one thousand five hundred dollars to two thousand dollars. This expenditure of money explains the fine craftsmanship and unique design features of the structure. Additionally, Mr. Kale constructed an "auto barn" in 1907, indicating that he was an early car owner. Mr. Kale lived on the property until 1914 and was succeeded by R. M. Moore, who worked in real estate. In 1925, the house was occupied by Sam L. Moore, also in real estate. In 1931, Rolla Alford, a music teacher, moved in along with E. T. Bell, and it was Mr. Bell who constructed the Music Art Hall. 

The history of the Kale House and the Music Art Hall and their evolution are interesting chapters in the history of Long Beach, illustrating the ebb and flow of cultural and religious activities intertwined with the history of individual people. The transformation of a sumptuous and imposing residence into a cultural institution, accomplished by Rolla Alford, took place during the Great Depression and Second World War. Continued residential use coexisted with art activities. 

The two structures have a high level of architectural style. The Kale House has many similarities to other homes in the area constructed in the same time period; however, it is a unique creation with many customized architectural features and design amenities. The stucco cladding, simple massing, low-pitched roof and horizontal projecting porch relating to the Prairie style; the corner tower and bay, intricate moldings and patterned window mullions derive from Victorian precedents; and the exposed roof rafters, window type and proportions, door, and interiors, come from the Craftsman style. The Arts Hall also defies stylistic classification, blending motifs from different architectural traditions. The facade is a simplified Spanish Renaissance, while the interior wood truss ceiling is reminiscent of Gothic-style churches. 

B. Rationale for Historic Landmark Designation. In accordance with the provisions of Section 2.63.050 of this Code, the City Council finds that the following reasons exist relative to the designation of the Kale House and the Music Art Hall as historic landmarks: 

    1. The Kale House and the Music Art Hall possess a significant character, interest or value attributable to the development, heritage and cultural characteristics of the City, the Southern California region, and the State of California. When originally constructed in 1907 at great expense, the Kale House was intended by its owner/builder to be a significant and prestigious home. The home demonstrates the high quality and style in residential architecture that is sometimes manifest during the early years of Long Beach's development. While the first decade of the 1900s saw a building boom in Long Beach, this house is both part of that boom and distinguished from it by its unique architectural qualities. The designer created an eclectic blend of three different architectural styles: Victorian, Craftsman and Prairie. The window designs are unique and individual. A further dimension of cultural value was added with the construction of the adjacent Music Art Hall in 1936, which later became the Alford Arts Academy. As its size was equivalent to a small-scale single-family house, the Hall blended easily into the residential neighborhood. Later, two different religious organizations occupied the property: first the Church of Religious Science, then Temple Beth-El. The mix of residential, artistic and religious institutional uses of the buildings over the years has contributed positively to the cultural life of the neighborhood and the City. 

    2. The Kale House and the attached Music Art Hall contain elements of design, detail, materials or craftsmanship which represent a significant innovation.

The eclectic design of the Kale House and many of its unique design features represent a significant innovation for its period. The stucco cladding, simple massing, low-pitched hip roof and projecting front porch with its strong horizontal roofline are features of Prairie architectural style. The corner turret with a conical roof and a bay window below derive from Victorian Queen Ann architecture. The window types, front door, extended rafter tails and many interior design features relate to the Craftsman style. The opposing semicircular designs in the upper portion of the windows are unique and unusual. The Music Art Hall likewise reflects an eclectic style with many unique design features including a simplified Spanish Renaissance facade and interior wood truss ceiling reminiscent of Gothic-styled churches. 
    3. The Kale House and the attached Music Art Hall represent an established and familiar visual feature of a neighborhood or community due to its unique location or specific distinguishing characteristics. The unusual architectural design of the Kale House, with its corner turret and conical roof placed at the intersection of Ninth Street and Linden Avenue, is a visual landmark in the neighborhood. The coupling of the house with the attached Music Art Hall is likewise unique and distinctive. The bold, simple design of the auditorium facade establishes a strong visual presence in its residential neighborhood.
C. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the United States Secretary of the Interior (Revised, 1991), as amended, as well as the "Procedures for Administering the Certificate of Appropriateness" found in Section 2.63.070 of this Code are incorporated herein by this reference. The guidelines are to be used as standards for the Cultural Heritage Commission in making decisions about Certificates of Appropriateness as required by Chapter 2.63 of this Code. The guidelines are an aid to property owners and others formulating plans for new construction, for rehabilitation or alteration of an existing structure, and for site development. The goal of the Certificate of Appropriateness review is to retain and preserve all original architectural materials and design features; to encourage rehabilitation which restores original historic fabric rather than remodels; and to ensure architectural compatibility between new and old. 

D. Standards and Guidelines. 

    1. Changes requiring a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Cultural Heritage Commission are as follows: 
      a. Alterations or additions to roof; change in roof materials. 
      b. Additions. 
      c. Alterations to structure including foundation. 
      d. Alterations to windows. 
      e. Changes to doors and doorways. 
      f. Changes to exterior materials or colors. 
      g. Changes to exterior walkways or driveways. 
      h. Alterations or addition to fencing.
16.52.1020 The Foster & Kleiser Building. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following buildings as historical landmarks in the City: The Foster & Kleiser Building, constructed in 1923, and a garage plus an office building constructed by Foster & Kleiser in 1930. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Constructed in 1923, added on to in 1930, and located at 1429 Magnolia Avenue, the Foster & Kleiser Building was designed by noted Long Beach architect Clarence Aldrich in the Mission Revival style, with some Art Deco detailing on the towers. The property contains three distinct sections: an older building constructed in 1923 and used by Foster & Kleiser for manufacturing billboards; and a garage plus an office building constructed in 1930. The office facade fronts on Magnolia Street and has an asymmetrically placed arched doorway with molded arch inset in a rectangular frame. The recessed door is the original one, wood with glass center, sidelights and transom window. Tall double-hung wood sash multipaned windows pierce the stucco facade, two on one side of the door, three on the other. The dominant architectural feature is the paired corner Mission Revival towers, with round copper domes (now painted). A strap relief ornament placed under the domes is an upside-down Art Deco skyscraper or inverted stepped pattern. The interior contains approximately ten offices which have their original wood compartment walls, constructed of finely detailed hardwood (now painted) and glass. The original wood doors with transom windows are still in place. The bathroom floor has colorful, detailed hexagonal tile. The interior is illuminated by metal frame wire glass vertical skylights with their original hardware. The rest of the office interior has been modernized. The brick masonry garage with wood bridge truss ceiling is used today for manufacturing, and has a dropped ceiling. The interior walls are painted brick and the windows are steel casement with wire glass. The exterior facade on Cowles Street is stuccoed; the facade facing the parking area is red brick masonry with a dutch gable. The anchor bolts piercing the facade trace the arched outline of the truss ceiling. The 1923 manufacturing building has a stucco front on Cowles Street, but corrugated aluminum walls inside and on the wall facing the parking lot. The exterior of this building on Cowles has an asymmetrical curvilinear roofline at the corner and a false front with a horizontal roofline. Inside, there is a pitched roof, pierced by sky lights. The interior contains multiple wood vertical supports and wood horizontal beams originally fabricated for billboard manufacture. Both the garage and 1923 manufacturing building have large garage doors, modern steel ones on Cowles Street and older ones on the parking lot side. There is a vintage freestanding low billboard sign at the edge of the property facing southward bound traffic on Magnolia, a configuration common for 1920's billboards. 

B. Rationale for Historic Landmark Designation. In accordance with the provisions of Section 2.63.050 of this Code, the City Council finds that the following reasons exist relative to the designation of the Foster & Kleiser Building constructed in 1923 and the Foster & Kleiser garage plus office building constructed in 1930 as historic landmarks: 

    1. The Foster & Kleiser Building and garage plus office building possess a significant character, interest or value attributable to the development, heritage or cultural characteristics of the City, the Southern California region, and the State of California. As the South Bay headquarters of a major industrial firm, Foster & Kleiser Outdoor Advertising, this property was an important factor in the economy of Long Beach. It signaled the importance of the City as a venue for the Foster & Kleiser market, along with other major cities on the West Coast. It is also symptomatic of the leading role that automobiles and auto-related infrastructure played in the development of Southern California. As streets, boulevards, highways and freeways were laid out and expanded, the commercial billboard was not far behind. The nation's "car culture" is primarily associated with Southern California, along with its various architectural artifacts, including the manufacture of billboard advertising. The Long Beach branch of Foster & Kleiser was acquired in 1922 by purchasing property from H. B. Whited. The construction of the Long Beach branch was supervised by Mr. George Kleiser personally, and opened in 1923. The office portion and garage were constructed in 1930 and established an architectural presence on Magnolia Avenue. The Foster & Kleiser firm remained at the location until 1962, when it was closed and consolidated by Metro Media with the Los Angeles branch. In 1964, another business, Power Conversion, Inc., an electronics firm, moved into the buildings. Reminders of the Foster & Kleiser legacy remain in the vintage billboard on Magnolia Street and in the interior of the older building on Cowles Street, with its framework for billboard manufacture. Today the complex of buildings continues in industrial use as a small manufacturing plant. The Foster & Kleiser company was very important to the economy of Southern California, nourished by the predominance of the automobile, boulevards and freeways, in the creation of a regional "car culture". In addition, the architect, Clarence Aldrich, was a prominent Long Beach architect, who also designed a Tudor Revival mansion at 4252 Country Club Drive in Long Beach in 1927 which has since been designated as a Long Beach historic landmark: The Dawson-Prey House. 

    2. The Foster & Kleiser buildings contain elements of design, detail, materials or craftsmanship which represent a significant innovation. Architecturally, the office portion of the complex is significant for its style, Mission Revival, which makes a late appearance in this building. The Mission Revival style was prevalent from approximately 1905 through 1915 and by 1930 had long been eclipsed. Thus, the building may be considered Mission Revival. The cascading stepped relief design on the towers, looking like an upside-down skyscraper, is an Art Deco reinterpretation of the Mission Revival strap ornament. The plain stucco walls and terra cotta roof are classic features of Spanish Colonial Revival designs which were prevalent in 1930. The building makes a dramatic architectural statement, unusual in a manufacturing district. 

    3. The Foster & Kleiser Building is associated with the life of a person or persons significant to the community, City, region or Nation. Mr. Walter Foster and Mr. George Kleiser were pioneering business entrepreneurs, who founded a small business in 1901 which expanded to a nationwide chain by 1929. Their accomplishment in creating a new business activity, which was perfectly suited to the times, was visionary. Mr. Kleiser served as President of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America from 1930-1935. During the Second World War, Foster & Kleiser manufactured defense material and assisted in the war effort, for which they were recognized in a Times Magazine article in 1944. 

    4. The Foster & Kleiser Building portrays the environment in an era of history characterized by a distinctive architectural style. The Mission Revival style of the office building is associated with the Southern California region, and was popular from approximately 1905 through 1915 as a vernacular style recalling the Southern California missions. Its revival in this building, constructed in 1930, is a more nostalgic and romantic evocation of California's past. Characteristic features are the use of stucco walls and red tile roof, simple doors and windows, and particularly the pair of Mission Revival towers at the corners, topped with a hemispherical dome. An Art Deco flavor is imparted to the towers with the inverted stepped relief forms which cascade from the domes, reflecting a 1930's esthetic. 

    5. The Foster & Kleiser buildings embody those distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type or engineering specimen. One portion of the property contains an industrial building where the billboards were manufactured. It is typical of its time and its function. A large rectangular "barn" with a gabled roof lit by skylights, it contains a system of interior posts and beams built as the scaffolding for billboard painting and manufacture. 

    6. The Foster & Kleiser buildings are part of or related to a distinctive area and should be developed or preserved according to a specific historical, cultural or architectural motif. The buildings are located in the industrial section of downtown Long Beach, and are part of its distinct identity. However, the buildings have a more impressive architectural presence than other industrial buildings surrounding it.

C. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the United States Secretary of the Interior (Revised, 1991), as amended, as well as the "Procedures for Administering the Certificate of Appropriateness" found in Section 2.63.070 of this Code are incorporated herein by this reference. The guidelines are to be used as standards for the Cultural Heritage Commission in making decisions about Certificates of Appropriateness as required by Chapter 2.63 of this Code. The guidelines are an aid to property owners and others formulating plans for new construction, for rehabilitation or alteration of an existing structure, and for site development. The goal of the Certificate of Appropriateness review is to retain and preserve all original architectural materials and design features; to encourage rehabilitation which restores original historic fabric rather than remodels; and to ensure architectural compatibility between new and old. 

D. Standards and Guidelines. 

    1. Changes requiring a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Cultural Heritage Commission are as follows: 
      a. Alterations or additions to roof; change in roof materials. 
      b. Additions. 
      c. Alterations to structure including foundation. 
      d. Alterations to windows. 
      e. Changes to doors and doorways. 
      f. Changes to exterior materials or colors. 
      g. Changes to exterior walkways or driveways. 
      h. Alterations or addition to fencing.
16.52.1030 The Anna R. Brown Residence. 

A. Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as a historic landmark in the City: The Anna R. Brown Residence, constructed in 1901 for Anna R. Brown, wife of Edward R. Brown. The Anna R. Brown Residence is located at 1205 East Ocean Boulevard. 

16.52.1040 The Butler Residence. 

A. Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as a historic landmark in the City: The Butler Residence, constructed in 1932 for Mrs. Minnie Butler. The Butler Residence is located at 251 Junipero Avenue. 

B. The complete location, description and reasons for historic landmark designation are more fully contained in uncodified Section 2 of Ordinance No. C-7553. (Ord. C-7553 § 1, 1998).

Source: City of Long Beach   http://www.ci.long-beach.ca.us/

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