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 Long Beach HISTORIC LANDMARKS INFORMATION 2

 

16.52.280 The Linden House. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Linden House. 

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 847 Linden Avenue in the city of Long Beach, this two-story structure is square in plan with a high hip roof intersected by an offset gable with a false half timber pediment and segmented attic window with a cross gable, open to the side. A pediment gable with bas-relief "swag and seal" projects from a flared siding over the elevated recessed porch and has cast stone-type block supports and base. There are two elaborate leaded glass windows on the front facade. A stained glass window with a segmented transom is on the right side of the house. A leaded glass window is also located in the dining room bay. There is a recessed balcony on the second floor with composite Corinthian wood columns. The roof has brackets and dentils for ornamentation as well as exposed eaves with across bar linkage. Small dentils also appear on the capitals of the stone columns supporting the front porch. The attic floor was used as servants' quarters. 

Tax records indicate that the Linden House was built in 1907. It is listed in a 1908 city directory and its occupant was listed as Charles Reed, Building Contractor. His brother, and partner in contracting, was listed as living next door at 837. In 1911, the directory lists a new occupant of the house, Cecil A. Sensor, whose occupation was given as real estate. In 1913, Louisa Sensor was also listed as an occupant of the house. Beginning some time in the 1920s, the house was occupied by Mrs. Anna McClosky and Katherina McClosky. In 1933, following the earthquake, a building permit for $700 in repairs was issued and the contractor was listed as James Reed. Another building permit, issued in 1951 when asbestos siding was added to the house, lists William J. Gilson as the owner. The house has the original gas lights in many rooms. 

In summary, the Linden House is a significant architectural landmark because it is a good representation of the influence of local craftsmanship on the Queen Anne style of residential structures.  

16.52.290 The Termo Company Building.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Termo Company Building.  

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 3275 Cherry Avenue in the city of Long Beach, the Termo Company Building represents the importance of the discovery and production of oil in Long Beach and throughout California. The company owns and operates oil wells not only in Long Beach but throughout California and the rest of the United States. It was, in fact, nearly twenty years after the building was completed that oil was discovered under it and its surrounding property. Oil, according to Gerald White, is the gold of the twentieth century in California. And this unique building is the kind of work space that the leaders of one particular company chose for themselves. The building's unique architectural character represents the freedom to make nontraditional choices that success in the oil business gave to certain entrepreneurs.  

Once, the row of oil-related businesses along Cherry Avenue, mostly south of the Termo Company Building, was a center of business activity and technological innovation not only for the oil field on Signal Hill but for many other fields discovered throughout Southern California after the First World War. At about the same time these fields were discovered, other entrepreneurs were beginning to produce automobiles that were within the price range of millions of people. The existence of that market for gasoline encouraged the rapid exploitation of the recently discovered oil. Cherry Avenue in Long Beach and adjacent Signal Hill became an important center for sharing information, experimenting with new technology and accumulating capital for new projects.  

In summary, the Termo Company Building is an architecturally unique building that represents influence of the oil business on Long Beach and throughout California.  

It tells the story of a significant part of oil-related businesses and their influence in Long Beach and throughout California. It represents the affluence that comes to those who are successful in finding oil and the unbelievable quantity and rapidity with which it can overwhelm its owners.  
  

16.52.300 The Home Market Building.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Home Market Building.  

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 942-948 Daisy Avenue in the city of Long Beach, the Home Market Building, the structure was built in 1925 as a "Two-Story Brick Store And Dwelling for F.W. and W.C. Ovelman". The plans were prepared by the Long Beach architectural and engineering firm of Schilling and Schilling. It was originally operated as the Home Market with a residence for the Ovelmans above the market. The building represented a transition in the area from residential and small, temporary commercial uses to larger permanent commercial buildings. (It remains the only two-story commercial structure in the district today.) The firm of Schilling and Schilling later built the Lafayette Hotel, and were considered the fathers of "modern architecture applied to commercial buildings in Long Beach."  
  

16.52.310 The Farmers and Merchants Bank Office Tower.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Farmers and Merchants Bank Office Tower.  

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 320 Pine Avenue in the city of Long Beach, the Farmers and Merchants Bank Office Tower is a ten-story steel and terra cotta structure, designed by Curlett and Beelman and built in 1923 by the McNeil Construction Co. The structure was the city's first "skyscraper" and introduced the modern era of building design to the city. The building is characterized by classic detail along the top floor and along the second floor in the form of urns, scrollwork and a shell pattern. Many locally prominent attorneys, physicians and other professionals occupied offices in the bank tower, including two of Long Beach's mayors.  

16.52.320 The Long Beach Professional Building.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Long Beach Professional Building.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 117 East Eighth Street in the city of Long Beach, the Long Beach Professional Building, built in 1929, was the first large office building in Long Beach devoted exclusively to the practice of medicine. It attracted many well-known physicians and dentists to the Long Beach area. The building has a classic art-deco style lobby done in pinks and blacks. The structure itself is an eight-story, two-part vertical block and is a late example of art deco that introduced elements that became commonly used in the W.P.A. moderne style of the 1930's.  
  

16.52.330 Bixby Ranch House.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Bixby Ranch House.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 11 La Linda Drive in the city of Long Beach, the Bixby Ranch House is described as Colonial Revival in style and was designed by the San Francisco firm of Coxhead and Coxhead. The structure was completed in 1890 after three years of construction. The house was built for the son of George H. Bixby, oldest son of Jotham Bixby, and served as the headquarters for the Bixby ranch operations. The house contains almost seven thousand square feet of living space. The nine bedrooms and five bathrooms provided adequately for George Bixby's large family: he and Mrs. Bixby had seven children.  

B. General guidelines and standards for any changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (February, 1978), as amended, are incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:  

Any alterations, modifications or repair of the above structure shall be done so in keeping with its historic character.  
  

16.52.340 The Houser Building.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Houser Building.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 2740-46 East Broadway in the city of Long Beach, the Houser Building is a three-story brick commercial/residential structure constructed in 1929. The Italianate style building was constructed by W.J. Essen and designed by architect Joseph Halstead Roberts. Mr. Roberts designed approximately seventy structures in the City. Although many have been demolished, several still remain that attest to his talent as an architect. A most significant example is the St. Regis Apartments, a Long Beach Landmark by separate ordinance. This particular building represents a good example of an early neighborhood commercial development. It was constructed for Mr. John T. Houser, a prominent lawyer in Long Beach. The Houser family lived behind this structure at 2743 East Second Street. A bridge from the back of their home connected the structures.  

B. General guidelines and standards for any changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (February, 1978), as amended, are incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:  

Any alterations, modifications or repair of the above structure shall be done so in keeping with its historic character.  

16.52.350 The Harriman-Jones Clinic.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Harriman-Jones Clinic.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 211 Cherry Avenue in the city of Long Beach, the Harriman-Jones Clinic is described as composite period revival - Tuscan/ Roman villa in style. The original 1930 plan was a two-story central entrance to a reception room and waiting area that was flanked by two interior courtyards. The northern courtyard was roofed over in 1954. A two-story addition was built to the west in 1955 and a two-level parking deck was added to the parcel west of the alley in 1962. The east facade is in its original condition with a symmetrical portico In Antis. The Tuscan columns support half-round arches with smooth soffits leading to a stoop with stone benches on either side. On either side of the portico are pilasters supporting a pediment with an unornamented Tympanum. The acroteria receive stylized urns. An extended Escutcheon is mounted on the spandrel above the central arch and the second-story blocking course. A two-story pilaster is noted at each of the original four corners of the building and the west corners of the 1954 addition. At the north end of the ground floor of the east facade is a single bay truncated arch on pilasters with a glazed opening. This detail returns along the north facade for seven bays. The original balconies above bays three and four were removed in the seismic retrofitting of 1986. The 1986 seismic retrofitting was a partial repair for a Grade III building (Subdivision 80). The original building roof is a terra cotta tile with a two-foot overhang. The windows are metal casement with fixed shutters.  

Dr. Harriman Jones was one of Long Beach's most prominent physicians. He came to Long Beach in 1902 as one of the town's first doctors, and became the city's first health officer, setting up the city's public health regulations. He organized the Long Beach Hospital (now the site of St. Mary's Hospital), and helped organize Seaside Hospital where he served as chief of staff for many years. His concept for the clinic bearing his name was innovative, combining many medical services under one roof, and setting up a trust fund to provide medical services for the needy. Dr Jones was the first Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a Founding Member of the American Board of Surgery.  

The architect, Kenneth Wing, Sr., F.A.I.A., had a long and distinguished career spanning sixty years in Long Beach. He designed the Long Beach Arena, the Southern California Edison Building, United California Bank, the Physical Education facility at California State University, Long Beach, the Physical Science facility of University of California, Irvine, the Nuclear Medicine facility, and the Long Beach Community Hospital. His designs include the First Baptist Church of Long Beach, Jordan High School, Luther Burbank School, many homes in the Virginia Country Club and Bixby Knolls area, and the renovation of the historic Bixby Ranch in Los Cerritos. He was associated with Allied Architects in the design of Long Beach City Hall and Library complex, and the Terrace Theater and Exhibit Center.  

The Harriman-Jones Clinic (1930) was Wing's first major work as an independent architect. He considered it one of his most important works; his obituary in the Press-Telegram listed this building second in the long list of his achievements.  

This pedestrian-oriented clinic is located in a neighborhood setting and reflects the Period Revival architecture of the surrounding streets. It is situated at the intersection of the major north-south and east-west corridors of Cherry Avenue and Broadway. Its Italian Renaissance Revival portico, facing the park, has been an important presence in a residential community for almost sixty years.  

In summary, the Harriman-Jones Clinic exemplifies the development of modern and progressive medical health services in the city of Long Beach. Dr. Jones founded Long Beach's first hospital in a small building at 327 Daisy Avenue. The clinic on Cherry Avenue originally placed a hospital and various medical services under one roof, and offered health services to the poor. Dr. Jones also founded other hospitals, and served as the city's first health officer. Thus, this building embodies the history of modern medicine in the city of Long Beach.  
  

16.52.360 The Breakers Hotel.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 of the Long Beach Municipal Code and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Breakers Hotel.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 200 East Ocean Boulevard in the city of Long Beach, the Breakers Hotel was built in 1925. It contains one hundred seventy-two thousand square feet and rises thirteen stories with two or more floors below the bluff including a recessed parking lot. The design is Spanish Renaissance Revival with a sky room and tower. The plain, stucco walls with octagonal tile roof at the summit are set off by immense, elaborate concrete ornamentation over the main recessed entrance. The ornamentation is classically derived and includes bas-relief mermaid busts and the heads of Neptune. There are twelfth-floor balconies and vaulted arches onto a wrought iron fire escape landing. The building has double-hung windows with large arched windows at the ground floor. It also features a circular drive with olive trees. The building is a major visual landmark in the area on a palm-lined boulevard. There is a glass view room at the ninth floor rear.  

Construction was begun on the Breakers Hotel in 1925. Its developer, Fred B. Dunn, planned a fifteen-story, three hundred twenty-room hotel at a cost of one hundred thousand dollars. With W. Jay Burgin as contractor, the hotel opened within a year. Later it was purchased by Conrad Hilton who made the necessary repairs, added the Sky Room, and reopened the hotel. After Hilton sold the hotel, it became the Wilton Hotel until the 1970s when it was converted into a senior citizens' residence. In 1982 it was reconverted into a hotel and in 1988 is being changed back again into a senior citizens' residence.  

As noted, the Breakers Hotel is significant in its unique Spanish Renaissance design. It is one of the largest structures constructed in Long Beach built during the Twenties. In short, it is a fine example of 1920's resort era architecture. The decoration that surrounds the entrance is lavish, symbolizing the era and its structures. The remainder of the building is simple, and its three-dimensional massing distinguishes it on the Long Beach skyline. The interior of the building, especially the elegant lobby and lounge which reflect its 1920's resort era heritage, was refurbished in 1982. On the top of the building is the Sky Room restaurant decorated in contemporary Art Deco.  

B. General guidelines and standards for any changes. The Secretary of Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings are hereby incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the Cultural Heritage Commission are adopted:  

    1. Any alterations, modifications or repair of the Breakers Hotel shall be consistent and compatible, in architectural style and materials, with its historic character.  

    2. All plans for modifications, alterations, color changes, or structural additions to the exterior historic building and its site, including paths, driveways and landscaping, shall be applied for with a Certificate of Appropriateness.  

    3. No environmental changes that deviate from the approved rehabilitation plan shall be allowed unless a Certificate of Appropriateness has been applied and approved by the cultural heritage commission.  

    4. The ground floor lobby contains historic design elements, significant interior spaces and decorative features which form part of the building's unique character and should be preserved. These are original, large-arched windows, spacious proportions, floor-to-ceiling pillars and decorative cast plaster friezes and capitals. Alterations, modification, additions and other architectural changes shall be requested of the cultural heritage commission with a Certificate of Appropriateness.  
     

16.52.370 The Ocean Center Building.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 of the Long Beach Municipal Code and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Ocean Center Building.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. The Ocean Center Building is located at 110 West Ocean Boulevard in the city of Long Beach, is an outstanding example of essentially Spanish design incorporating red tile roofs. It also includes Italian details such as quoining on all corners. The building was designed to take advantage of ocean views by being terraced fourteen stories down the bluff. The north elevation of the building, facing Ocean Boulevard, is thirteen stories and incorporates a broken pediment and a shield with sea shells and the face of Neptune over the front entry. There is a balcony at the seventh floor front under a pediment with brackets. Formal pediments and battlements decorate all four sides. There is an arcade at the base of the building under the bluff which was intended to serve visitors to the Pike. The building is capped by an octagonal tower which originally held a fifty-foot concrete tower and lantern. A smaller tower decorates the rear of the building. The building is attractive from all sides, utilizing picturesque massing and several Mediterranean design features as detailed in the inventory sheet.  

B. It is significant as the first modern office building on the bluff, rising to the city's height limit at that time. Following the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, the fifty-foot concrete tower and lantern, two hundred twenty-eight feet from street level, were removed in June, 1934. In 1936, the building was renovated and today the building remains essentially unchanged, and serves as a point of reference in the Long Beach skyline.  

C. General guidelines and standards for any changes. The Secretary of Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings is incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines are adopted by the cultural heritage commission:  

    1. The building's exterior, its massing, stepped setbacks, central tower, turrets, parapets and exterior ornamentation are its most significant elements. Any changes (including change in color and/or replacement of windows), alterations, additions or other modifications to the exterior of the building shall require a Certificate of Appropriateness from the cultural heritage commission.  

    2. The entryway and lobby corridor contain important historic design and material features that should be maintained and preserved without alteration. These are: the marble terrazzo floor, painted entryway ceiling, marble walls and wainscot and mahogany wood panels. Modifications for maintenance and restoration shall be approved. Other modifications and replacement of existing features shall require a Certificate of Appropriateness.  

    3. Users of the office space above the public lobby are encouraged to retain the original "antique" architectural components, such as original mahogany doors, because the retention of these features adds considerable value to the entire building.  

    4. Original exterior site features, such as the large palm tree in front, the front lawn, and exterior stairs with railings, are to be maintained. Applications for modifications and replacement shall require a Certificate of Appropriateness.

16.52.380 The Adelaide M. Tichenor House.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Adelaide Tichenor House.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 852 East Ocean Boulevard in the city of Long Beach, the Adelaide M. Tichenor House was designed by noted architects Charles and Henry Greene. This craftsman bungalow is situated on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean and Long Beach Harbor. The "U"-shaped plan was developed with a two-story central base facing the ocean; two low-pitched, one-story wings extend rearward toward Ocean Boulevard from such side of the central base and once forming an intimate, protective terrace.  

Built in 1904, this structure is one of three Greene and Greene designed homes built in Long Beach. Most noted for their grand "ultimate bungalows" of 1907-1909, the Tichenor House is of major importance as it created a significant turning point in the Greene's career. It was the first house for which they designed all the interior furnishings (most of which were removed in a 1953 remodeling), creating a totally integrated work of art.  

The Tichenor House, more than any other house, marked a significant turning point in the evolution of the Greene's own architectural vocabulary. The design shows explicit Japanese influence and is more "Oriental" than any other Greene and Greene houses. Mrs. Tichenor had similar interest in oriental design, fine craftsmanship and decorative arts. She gave Charles and Henry Greene the opportunity and latitude to fully demonstrate their own new personal vocabulary, in terms of totality of work involving plan form structure, materials and detail.  

The primary entrance into the home was originally from the bluff side, while a Torii gate fully roofed in tile formed a ceremonial entrance from Ocean Boulevard into an oriental garden. The mutual interest in the Orient of both client and architects led to the selection of green tiles for the roof, an arched bridge over the pond in the garden, and the ceremonial roofed gateway.  

16.52.400 The Crest Apartments.  

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Crest Apartments.  

A. Location, description and reasons for designation. Located at 321 Chestnut Avenue in the city of Long Beach, the Crest Apartments building is a two-story, brick-faced apartment house with a flat roof. This structure is notable for the ornamentation on the facade. It is symmetrical, with a recessed entrance in the center. Flat, highly decorated pilasters with a similarly decorated cap surround the entrance. Above the cap is a stone crest supported by two carved figures and other ornamentation. All windows are surrounded by firebrick which contrasts sharply with the brick facade. French doors and windows highlight the ground floor; double-hung sash windows the upper floor. Ornamental iron miniature balconies adorn the upper windows, and large balconies the lower windows. The foundation is concrete, and the roofing material is composition.  

The structure is unusually rich in architectural ornamentation, and decorative elaboration of brick are rarely seen on small-scale apartments of this type. The facade is an excellent example of classical revival/Beaux-Arts design typical of that period.  

B. General guidelines and standards for any changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (Revised, 1983), as amended, are incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the cultural heritage commission are adopted:  

Any alterations, modifications or repair of the above structure shall be done so in keeping with its historic character, and any alteration, modifications or changes shall follow the Secretary of Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings.  

No environmental changes shall be permitted to the exterior of the building unless a Certificate of Appropriateness has been applied for and approved by the cultural heritage commission or by the city planning commission, upon appeal, authorizing such environmental changes. Nothing in this section shall be deemed to restrict internal modifications to the building not visible externally. (Ord. C-6643 § 2, 1989). 

Source: City of Long Beach   http://www.ci.long-beach.ca.us/

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