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Huntington Beach

 


 

Emergency Operations Center - Huntington Beach, California

 


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Wetlands are unique among biologic communities characterized by both aquatic and terrestrial features. Plants and animals that inhabit wetlands have successfully evolved morphological and physiological adaptations to the presence of high levels of salt and periodic inundation and desiccation, as well as to low concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water- logged soils and exposure to alternating salt and fresh water. Many wetland inhabitants, including salt marsh plants and some water birds are able to excrete the excessive amounts of salt that
are absorbed or ingested.In California, wetlands are commonly classified according to the length of time that an area is inundated or saturated by water or the types of  plants and animals an area supports. Five major wetland classifications: marine, estuarine,  lacustrine, riverine, and palustrine. Marine and estuarine wetlands are associated with the ocean and include coastal wetlands, such as tidal
marshes. Lacustrine wetlands are associated with lakes, while riverine wetlands are found along rivers and streams. Palustrine wetlands may be  isolated or connected wet areas and include marshes, swamps, and bogs.
 

Most of California's coastal wetlands are estuarine salt marshes with associated tidal channels and mudflats. Estuaries are formed where freshwater streams meet the sea, and contain variably brackish water. Salt marshes develop along the shores of protected estuarine bays and
river mouths, as well as in more marine-dominated bays and lagoons. Wetlands that are less common along the California coast are freshwater marshes, riparian wetlands, bogs, and vernal pools. Freshwater marshes occur in ponds and slow moving streams. Like salt water marshes, they
are vegetated mostly with herbaceous plants, predominantly cattails, and species of sedges, and rushes. Freshwater marshes have mineral soils  that are less fertile than those of salt marshes, and exhibit a greater variety of plant species than do salt marshes. Riparian wetlands, which occur on the banks of steams, rivers, and lakes, commonly feature woody vegetation such as red alder, wax myrtle, and willow.



Ecologists have estimated that a healthy salt marsh produces five to ten times as much oxygen and corresponding carbohydrate biomass per
acre as a wheat field. Marsh plants capture the energy of sunlight and form the basis the highly productive wetland food web. A key part of the
wetlands success is the breakdown of plant matter into detritus, which is then consumed by filter feeders, deposit feeders, and other omnivores
and scavengers. This assemblage of producers and consumers creates a large food web, with fish, birds, and humans as ultimate links.


wetlands are defined as land within the coastal zone which may be covered periodically or permanently with shallow water and include saltwater
marshes, freshwater marshes, open or closed brackish water marshes, swamps, mudflats, and fens.
Generally, wetlands are lands where saturation with water is the dominant factor determining the nature of soil development and the types of plant
and animal communities living in the soil and on its surface. (
Even as appreciation for the benefits provided by wetlands has grown over the last couple of decades, wetlands continue to be filled, drained,
and dredged. California today has only 10 percent of the wetlands that existed before settlement by Europeans. The Central Valley once had vast
wetlands extending over some 4 million acres; these have diminished to a mere 300,000 acres. Only 5 percent of the state's coastal wetlands
remain intact.

Coastal wetlands include a number of natural communities that share the unique combination of aquatic, semi-aquatic, and terrestrial habitats
that results from periodic flooding by tidal waters, rainfall, or runoff. Wetlands provide a habitat for a vast array of organisms, including many
endangered species. During peak annual migration periods, hundreds of thousands of birds migrating along the Pacific Flyway descend upon
these coastal wetlands in search of refuge and food. Coastal wetlands provide a vital link between land and open sea, exporting nutrients and
organic material to ocean waters, and harboring juveniles of numerous aquatic species including many fish. Water flow in these highly productive
communities circulates food, nutrients, and waste products throughout the system. Wetlands buffer the effects of storms, reducing shoreline
erosion, and improve water quality by filtering and assimilating many pollutants from sewage outfalls and agricultural runoff. In addition, wetlands
provide a unique opportunity for nature study.



Most of California's coastal wetlands are estuarine salt marshes with associated tidal channels and mudflats. Estuaries are formed where
freshwater streams meet the sea, and contain variably brackish water. Salt marshes develop along the shores of protected estuarine bays and
river mouths, as well as in more marine-dominated bays and lagoons. Wetlands that are less common along the California coast are freshwater
marshes, riparian wetlands, bogs, and vernal pools. Freshwater marshes occur in ponds and slow moving streams. Like salt water marshes, they
are vegetated mostly with herbaceous plants, predominantly cattails, and species of sedges, and rushes. Freshwater marshes have mineral soils
that are less fertile than those of salt marshes, and exhibit a greater variety of plant species than do salt marshes. Riparian wetlands, which occur
on the banks of steams, rivers, and lakes, commonly feature woody vegetation such as red alder, wax myrtle, and willow. Bogs, unlike marshes
and streams, have detrital soils composed of peat, and are vegetated mostly with mosses. Vernal pools occur in small depressions underlain by
dense, impenetrable claypan soils that allow water to accumulate in winter and spring. The pools support small, usually annual plants, which
flower as the water in the pools begin to evaporate.

Wetlands are unique among biologic communities in that they are characterized by both aquatic and terrestrial features. Plants and animals that
inhabit wetlands have successfully evolved morphological and physiological adaptations to the presence of high levels of salt and periodic
inundation and desiccation, as well as to low concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water- logged soils and exposure to alternating salt and
fresh water. Many wetland inhabitants, including salt marsh plants and some water birds are able to excrete the excessive amounts of salt that
are absorbed or ingested.

Ecologists have estimated that a healthy salt marsh produces five to ten times as much oxygen and corresponding carbohydrate biomass per
acre as a wheat field. Marsh plants capture the energy of sunlight and form the basis the highly productive wetland food web. A key part of the
wetlands success is the breakdown of plant matter into detritus, which is then consumed by filter feeders, deposit feeders, and other omnivores
and scavengers. This assemblage of producers and consumers creates a large food web, with fish, birds, and humans as ultimate links.

Decomposers, such as bacteria and fungi, also break down plant and animal matter and recycle the nutrients. Excrement from birds, fish, and
invertebrates further enhances marsh soils and waters with nitrogen rich compounds, which are taken up by algae and vascular plants. These
materials are transported and mixed by streamflows, tidal circulation, and even the activities of burrowing clams and shrimp. As a result, the
mudflats become rich in inorganic nutrients and organic foods. This "mixing bowl" helps to support the many links of the marsh's food chains. Salt
marsh food webs are among the most complex in nature.

Coastal wetlands are home to a variety of animals. Numerous fish species, including California killifish, bay goby, striped bass, topsmelt, and
starry flounder are residents of wetlands and depend upon them for reproduction. Subtidal eelgrass beds shelter larval and juvenile fish, as well
as many species of invertebrates. Salt marshes are home to insects such as the salt marsh water boatman, wandering skipper, and numerous
species of beetles and flies, which graze on leave and seeds, help to pollinate the wetland flowers, and prey upon a variety of small animals.
Clapper rails build platform nests in the low marsh, whereas Belding's savannah sparrows nest in and feed on the pickleweed of the higher
marsh. Salt marsh mammals include shrews, harvest mice, and other rodents; harbor seals haul out on pickleweed and saltgrass in south San
Francisco Bay.

Although relatively few bird species are year-round residents of coastal wetlands, many species temporarily inhabit salt marshes during their
annual migrations. Coastal California is part of the Pacific Flyway, one of the four principal bird migration routes in North America. During the
spring and fall months, coastal wetlands support flocks of waterfowl such as brant, pintails, mallard, and canvasbacks, and shorebirds such as
sandpipers, curlews, willets, and godwits, which stop here to rest, feed, and in some cases overwinter.

Since the 1850's 90 per cent of California's original coastal wetland acreage has disappeared, and many of the remaining wetlands are in
danger of being further degraded or destroyed due to landfill, diking, dredging, pollution, and other human disturbances. However, a growing
awareness of the importance of this habitat has led to efforts to protect existing wetlands, and to restore those that have been degraded.

www.coastalconservancy.ca.gov

Monterey - Wetlands
The Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary includes one of the largest and last remaining coastal wetland in California, Elkhorn Slough. Located near
the town of Mosslanding, Elkhorn Slough stretches about 11 miles inland. Elkhorn slough does not connect to a river and for most of the year
does not have a fresh water source. To be called a slough a waterway must be edged with marshy muddy ground. During the winter season
Elkhorn slough transforms into an estuary as the Elkhorn waterway mixes freshwater (in this case from rain run off) with saltwater.

The slough provides excellent habitat for over 80 species of fishes and 270 species of birds. Many of the birds that live in the slough are
migratory. The tide recedes twice a day exposing the mud flats. Many thousands of worms, snails, crabs and clams live in the mud. The animals
that live in the mud flats provide an abundant food source for all the fishes and birds the live in the slough.

Santa Margarita

Friends of the Santa Margarita River P.O. Box 563 Wildomar, CA 92595 www.santamargaritariver.org

The Santa Margarita River is the last free-flowing river in coastal southern California. It forms the most extensive riparian corridor in the region, a
virtually unbroken line of woodland and scrub from Temecula to the coastal wetlands. It is the only waterway that contains most of its original
complement of native species, making it a living museum of the way southern California used to be and an ideal place to study natural
processes.

The incredible diversity of plant and animal species in the Santa Margarita River basin includes more than 500 plants, 236 birds, 52 mammals,
43 reptiles and amphibians, and 24 species of aquatic invertebrates. This regional ecosystem is like an ark: a refuge of biodiversity where native
plants and wildlife are able to survive and thrive. The Santa Margarita riparian corridor contains the highest density and overall diversity of bird
species of any natural area in a southern California coastal river basin, including the least Bell’s vireo and the southwestern willow flycatcher. The
268-acre estuary is located in the southwest corner of Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base, and teems with wildlife. The sand dunes and
mudflats of the wetlands provide the nation’s largest nesting area for the California least tern as well as an important nesting area for the snowy
plover.

The Friends of the Santa Margarita River work to preserve the river and its 740 square mile watershed, monitor wildlife and educate the public.

The San Luis Rey River Estuary is located in the City of Oceanside. The watershed extends into unincorporated San Diego County. The vast
majority of the 164-acre floodplain is privately owned. The Oceanside Harbor and the lower river channel are owned by the City of Oceanside.

San Luis Rey River is an ephemeral river which stays dry most of the time. In 1977, the peak discharge at the mouth was estimated for a
100-year flood to be 51,000 cubic feet per second. The river is confined by a 400-foot wide earthen channel bounded by two levees along the
lower seven miles. Mineral and aggregate mining has occurred at several sites in the river channel. The Henshaw Dam, built in 1922, controls
36% of the watershed.

Wetlands in the floodplain were once used for agriculture. The City of Oceanside discharged treated wastewater into the river from 1958 to
1974. The estuary at the mouth of the river was dredged in 1964 to create the Oceanside Harbor.

Today, the Oceanside General Plan Land Use Element designates the majority of the San Luis Rey River floodway as General Open Space or
Agricultural. The lower part of the river is within a designated Resource Conservation Area overlay in the County General Plan.

The wetland is used by eight “sensitive” bird species. Other special status species include black-shouldered kite, white-faced ibis, western
snowy plover, Belding’s savannah sparrow, and least Bell’s vireo.

The estuary, which once sprawled more than 2,200 acres, has been altered by agriculture and urban development within the floodplain and
watershed; and mineral and aggregate extraction in the channel. A Habitat Conservation Plan has been developed for the river’s least Bell’s
vireo population and is currently being implemented. The plan designates 12 acres of riparian habitat west of I-5 as Conserved Habitat.
http://www.seaworld.org/swc/wetlands/sd_county_wetlands/



ALGAE

Green Algae Enteromorpha sp.
Sea Lettuce Ulva sp.


PLANTS

Alkali-Heath Frankenia grandifolia
Alkali-Heath Frankenia salina Jtn.
Alkali-Mallow Malvella leprosa (Ortega)Krapov.
Alkali-Weed Cressa truxillensis HBK. var vallicola (Heller) Munz.
Alkali-Weed Malvella neglecta
Baccharis, Broom Baccharis sarothroides Gray.
Bassia, Five-Hook Bassia hyssopifola (Pall.) Knutze
Bather's Delight Ambrosia chamissonis Less.
Bindweed Convolvulus arvensis L.
Blue Gum Eucalyptus globulus Labill
Blue Witch Solanum umbelliferum Eschs. var. glabrescens Torr
Brass-Buttons Cotula coronopifolia L.
Brome, California Bromus carinatus H. & A.
Broom, French Cytisus monspessulanus L.
Buckwheat, California Eriogonum fasiculatum Benth. ssp. fasciculatum
Buckwheat, Slender Eriogonum gracile Benth. var. denudata
Buckwheat, Tall Eriogonum elongatum Benth.
Bulrush Scirpus microcarpus
Bulrush, Alkali Scirpus robustus
Bulrush, California Scirpus californicus (C.A.Mey) Steudel
Bulrush, Olney's Scirpus olneyi
Bulrush, Viscid Scirpus acutus Muhl ex Bigel
Bur-reed Sparganium eurycarpum
Cactus, Coastal Barrel Ferocactus viridescens (Nutt.) Britton& Rose.
Cattail, Common Typha latifolia L
Cattail, Tule Typha domingensis Pers.
Checker-Bloom Sidalcea malvaeflora (DC) Gray ex Benth. ssp. sparsifolia C.L. Hitchc.
Cinquefoil Potentilla sp.
Cholla, Coastal Opuntia prolifera Engelm.
Clover, Indian Sweet M. indicus (L) All.
Clover, Spanish- Lotus purshianus (Benth.) Clem.&Clem. sp. purshianus
Clover, White Sweet Melilotus albus Desr.
Cocklebur, Eastern Xanthium strumarium var canadense (Mill) T. & GL.
Cordgrass Spartina foliosa
Cottonwood, Fremont's Populus fremontii Wats. var. fremontii
Coyote Brush B. pilularis DC ssp consanguinea ( DC ) C.B. Wolf
Cudweed, Bicolor Gnaphaliumbicolor Bioletti
Deer Weed, Coastal Lotus scoparius (Nutt. in T.&G.) Ottley ssp. scoparius
Desert Thorn, California Lycium californicum Nutt.
Ditch-grass Ruppia maritima
Dock, Curly Rumex crispus L.
Dock, Whorled Rumex conglomeratus Murr.
Dodder Cuscuta salina
Dodder, Salty Cuscuta salina var salina Engelm.
Duckweed, Least Lemna minima Phil.
Dudleya, Coastal Dudleya lanceolata (Nutt.) Britt. & Rose.
Everlasting Gnaphalium californicum DC.
Everlasting, Fragrant Gnaphalium beneolens Davids
Everlasting, Pink Gnaphalium ramosissimum Nutt.
Everlasting, White Gnaphalium microcephalum Nutt.
Fat Hen Atriplex patula ssp. hastata (L.) Hall & Clem
Fennel, Sweet Foeniculum vulgare Mill.
Fig, Hottentot- Carpobrotus edulis (L.) Bolus.
Fig,Sea- Carpobrotus aequilaterus (Haw.) N.E. Brown.
Flatsedge, Tall Cyperus eragrostis Lam.
Foxtail Chess Bromus rubens
Giant Reed Arundo donax L.
Glasswort, Parish's Salicornia subterminalis Parish.
Glasswort, Slender Salicornia europaea L.
Glasswort, Woody Salicornia virginica L.
Goldenbush, Coastal Isocoma veneta var vernonioides Jeps.
Goldenbush, Sawtooth Hazardia squarrosus (H.&A.) Greene
Goldfields, Common Lasthenia chrysostoma (R.&M.) Greene.
Goldfields, Southern Lasthenia coronaria (Nutt.) Ornduff.
Goosefoot, California Chenopodium californicum (Wats) Wats
Goosefoot, Cut-Leaf Chenopodium multifidum L.
Grass, Pampas Cortaderia atacamensis (Phil.) Pilger.
Gumplant, Big Grindelia robusta Nutt.
Heliotrope, Seaside Heliotropium curassavicum var. oculatum
Hoary Cress Cardaria draba (L.) Desv.
Horsetail Equisetum arvense
Ice Plant, Crystal Gasoul crystallinum L.
Ice Plant, Little Gasoul nodiflorum L.
Jaumea, Fleshy Jaumea carnosa (Less.) Gray.
Knotweed, Yard Polygonum aviculare L.
Ladies-Fingers Dudleya edulus (Nutt.) Moran
Lemonade Berry Rhus integrifolia (Nutt.) Benth & Hook.
Lotus, Bishop's Lotus strigosus (Nutt. in T&G) Greene var strigosus
Lotus, Nuttall's Lotus nuttallianus Greene.
Marsh-Elder, San Diego Iva hayesiana Gray
Marsh-Pennywort, Whorled Hydrocotlye verticillata Thumb. var verticillata
Milkmaids Cardamine californica (Nutt.) Greene.
Miner's-Lettuce Claytonia perfoliata Donn. var. perfoliata
Mugwort, Douglas Artemisia douglasiana Bess in Hook
Mule Fat Baccharis glutinosa Pers.
Mustard, Black Brassica nirga (L) Koch
Mustard, Field Brassica rapa ssp. sylvestris (L.) Janche
Nightshade, Parish's Solanum parishii Heller
Nut-Grass Cyperus esculentus L.
Oak, Scrub Quercus dumosa Nutt.
Parsley, Water Oenanthe sarmentosa
Pennywort, Marsh Hydrocotyle ranunculoides
Pepper-Tree, Brazilian Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi.
Pepper-Tree, Peruvian Schinus molle L.
Peppergrass, Dwarf Lepidum latipes Hook
Pickleweed Salicornia bigelovii
Pickleweed Salicornia europaea L.
Pickleweed, Common Salicornia virginica L
Pine, Torrey Pinus torreyana Parry ex Carr
Plantain, Common Plantago major L.
Plantain, Dot-Seed Plantago erecta Morris. ssp. erecta
Poison Oak Toxicodendron diversiloba
Pondweed Potamogeton nodosus
Ponyfoot, Western Dichondra occidentalis House.
Prickly-Pear Opuntia littoralis var. ittoralis(Engelm)Ckll
Ragweed, Western Ambrosia psilostachya DC var. californica (Rydb) Blake
Ribgrass Plantago lanceolata L.
Rosemary, Marsh Limonium californicum
Rosemary, Notchleaf Marsh Limonium sinuatum (L.) Mill.
Rosemary, San Diego Limonium californicum var. mexicanum (Blke) Munz
Rush Juncus balticus
Rush, Mexican Juncus arcticus ssp. mexicanus Willd.
Rush, Pointed Juncus oxymeris Engelm.
Rush, Toad Juncus bufonius
Rush, Wrinkled Juncus rugulosus Engelm.
Rush, Yosemite Dwarf- Juncus triformis Engelm.
Ryegrass, Italian Lolium perenne L. ssp. multiflorum (Lam.) Husnot
Sagebrush, Coastal Artemisia californica Less
Sagewort, Dragon Artemisia dracunculus L.
Sagewort, San Diego Artemisia palmeri Gray
Salt Bush Atriplex patula ssp. hastata
Salt-Marsh bird's beak Cordylanthus maritimus
Salt-Marsh Daisy, Coulter's Lasthenia glabrata Lindl. ssp. coulteri (Gray Ornduff.
Salt-Marsh Fleabane Pluchea odorata var odorata (L.) Cass.
Saltbush, Australian Atriplex semibaccata R.Br.
Saltbush, Brewer's Atriplex canescens ssp. canescens(Pursh) Nut ssp. breweri (Wats) Hall & Clem
Saltgrass Distichlis spicata (L. Greene var. spicata
Saltmarsh Bird's Beak Cordylanthus maritimus
Saltwort Batis maritima
Salty Susan Jaumea carnosa (Less.) Gray.
Sand-Aster, San Diego Lessingia filaginifolia var. californica (D.C.) M.A. Lane (Hook & Arn)
Sand-Spurry Spergularia villosa (Pers.) Camb
Sand-Spurry, Buccone's Spergularia bocconii (Scheele) Foucauc
Sand-Spurry, Salt Marsh Spergularia marina (L.) Griseb.
Sand-Verbena, Beach Abronia umbellata Lam.
Scale-Broom Lepidospartum squamatus (Gray) Gray
Scirpus Scirpus microcarpus
Sea Rocket Cakile maritima Scop.
Sea-Blite Suaeda californica
Sea-Blite Suaeda fruticosa
Sea-Blite, Torrey's Suaeda torreyana Wats.
Sea-Dahlia Coreopsis maritima (Nutt.) Hook.
Sea-Lavender Limonium californicum

Sea-Tassle, Breakfruit Ruppia maritima L.
Shad Scale Atriplex canescens ssp. canescens(Pursh) Nut.
Shoregrass Monanthochloe littoralis Engelm.
Silverweed Potentilla egedei
Smartweed, Swamp Polygonum coccineum
Soft Flag Typha latifolia L.
Spike-rush, Common Eleocharis macrostachya
Spike-Sedge, Donbey's Eleocharis acicularis var. montevidensis
Spike-Sedge, Needle Eleocharis acicularis (L) R.&S.
Spiny Rush, Southwestern Juncus acutus L. var. sphaerocarpus Engelm
Swamp Timothy Crypsis schoenoides (L)Lam.
Sycamore, California 'Platanus racemosa Nutt.
Tamarisk Tamarix parviflora DC.
Tarweed, Fascicled Hemizonia fasciculata (DC.) T & G.
Telegraph Weed Heterotheca grandiflora Nutt.
Thistle, Russian- Salsola iberica Sennen & Pau
Three Square Scirpus americanus Pers
Tobacco, Tree Nicotiana glauca Grah.
Tocalote Centaurea melitensis L.
Tule, Common Scirpus acutus
Vetch, Common Vicia angustifolia Reichard.
Wallflower, Erysimum capitatum (Dougl.) Greene.
Water-Cress Rorippa nasturium-aquaticum (L.) Sching&Theil.
Wild Oat Avena fatua L.
Wild Oat, Slender Avena barbata Brot.
Willow, Arroyo Salix lasiolepis Benth var. lasiolepis
Willow, Lance-Leaf Salix lasiandra Benth var. lancifolia (Anderss.) Bebb
Willow, Pussy Salix discolor
Willow, Red Salix laevigata Bebb var. laevigata
Wishbone Bush Mirabilis californica Gray var. californica
Witch's Hair Cuscuta californica H.&A. var californica
Yarrow, California Achillea millefolium L. var. californica (Pollard) Jeps.
Yerba mansa Anemopsis californica

INVERTEBRATES

Aquatic Organisms

Crustaceans Crustacea
Crayfish Cambarus sp
Fiddler crab Uca crenulata
Ghost shrimp Callianassa californiensis
Pacific Coast crayfish Pacifastacus sp.
Striped shore crab Pachygrapsus crassipes
Oregon mud crab Hemigrapsus oregonensis
Yellow shore crab Hemigrapsus oregonensis
Amphipods Amphipoda
Beach hopper Orchestia traskiana
Isopods Isopoda
Segmented Worms Annelida

Polychaeta

Capitella capitata
Nereid worm Nereidae
Spionid worm Spionidae

Polydora sp.
Tube worm Phoronidae
Leeches, Earthworms & Related Oligochaeta

Streblospio sp.
Ribbon Worms Nemertea
Molluscs Mollusca
Bivalves Bivalvia
Bay mussel Mytilus edulis
Bent-nosed clam Macoma nasuta
California jacknife clam Tagelus californianus
Gaper clam Tresus nuttalli
Little-neck clam Protothaca staminea
Pacific oyster Ostrea lurida
Razor clam Tagelus subteres
Smooth chione clam Chione fluctifraga
Speckled scallop Argopecten aequisulcatus
Washington clam Saxidomus nuttalli
Marine Snails Gastropoda
California assiminea Assiminea californica
California cone snail Conus californicus
California horn snail Cerithidea california
California paper bubble Bulla gouldiana
Channeled basket snail Nassarius fossatus
Green paper bubble Haminoea virescens
Mud nassa Nassarius tegula
Salt marsh snail Melampus olivaceus
Small barrel bubble Cylichnella sp.
Striped sea hare Navanax inermis
Turban snail Tegula sp.
Insects Insecta
Waterboatman Corixidae
Saltmarsh Waterboatman Trichocorixa reticulata
Terrestrial Organisms

Insects

Beetles Coleoptera

Coleomegilla fuscilabris
Calif. Ladybird Beetle Coccinella californica
Convergent Ladybird Hippodamia convergens
Dorothy's El Segundo dune weevil Trigonoscuta dorothea dorothea
Globose dune beetle Coelus globosus
Ironclad beetle Phloeodes diabolicus
Rove beetles Staphylinidae
Stink beetle Eleodes sp.
Tiger beetle Cicindela oregona
Flies and Midges Diptera
Long-legged flies Dolichopodidae
Midges Chironomidae
Moth and sand flies Psychodidae
Shore flies Ephydridae
Ants, Bees, and wasps Hymenoptera
Butterflies and moths Lepidoptera
Salt marsh wandering skipper Panoquina errans
Springtails Collembola
True bugs Hemiptera
Cicadas, Hoppers, Whiteflies, Aphids, and Scales Homoptera
Thrips Thysanoptera
Dragonflies and Damselflies Odonata





FISH

Anchovy, Deepbody Anchoa compressa
Anchovy, Northern Engraulis mordax
Bass, Large-mouth Micropterus salmoides
Bass, Smallmouth Micropterus dolomieui
Blue Gill Lepomis macrochirus
Bullhead Ictalurus spp.
Carp, Common Cyprinus carpio
Catfish Ictaluridae
Crappie Pomoxis spp.
Goby, Arrow Clevelandia ios
Goby, Bay Lepidogobius lepidus
Goby, Shadow Quietula ycauda
Goby, Tidewater Eucyclogobius newberryi
Goby, Yellowfin Acanthogobius flavimanus
Grunion, California Lauresthes tenuis
Halibut, California Paralichthys californicus
Killifish, California Fundulus parvipinnis
Molly, Sailfin Poecilia latipinna
Mosquitofish Gambusia affinis
Mudsucker, Longjaw Gillichthys mirabilis
Mullet, Striped Mugil cephalus
Pipefish, Bay Syngnathus leptorhynchus
Sculpin, Pacific Staghorn Leptocottus armatus
Steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri)
Stingray, Round Urolophus halleri
Sunfish, Green Lepomis cyanellus
Topsmelt Atherinops affinis
Turbot, Diamond Hypsosetta guttulata


BIRDS

Special Status Birds Identified in the Inventory

American peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus anatum
American white pelican Pelecanus erythrorhynchos
Bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus
Belding's Savannah sparrow Passerculus sandwichensis beldingii
Black skimmer Rynchops niger
Black tern Chlidonias niger
Burrowing owl Speotyto cunicularia
California brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis californicus
California gnatcatcher Polioptila californica
California gull Larus californicus
California horned lark Eremophila alpestris actia
California least tern Sterna antillarum browni
Common loon Gavia immer
Cooper's hawk Accipiter cooperi
Double-crested cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus
Elegant tern Sterna elegans
Gull-billed tern Sterna nilotica
Large-billed Savannah sparrow Passerculus sandwichensis rostratus
Least Bell's vireo Vireo bellii pusillus
Light-footed clapper rail Rallus longirostris levipes
Long-billed curlew Numenius americanus
Marsh hawk Circus cyaneus
Merlin Falco columbarius
Northern harrier Circus cyaneus
Osprey Pandion haliaetus
Sharp-shinned hawk Accipiter striatus
Short-eared owl Asio flammeus
Swainson's hawk Buteo swainsoni
Tri-colored blackbird Agelaius tricolor
Western least bittern Ixobrychus exilis hesperis
Western snowy plover Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus
White-faced ibis Plegadis chihi


AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES

Arboreal Salamander Aneides lugubris
Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana
California Kingsnake Lampropeltis getulus
Coast Patch-nosed Snake Salvadora hexalepis
Coastal Rosy Boa Lichanura trivirgata roseofusca
Coastal Whiptail Cnemidophorus tigris
Coronado Skink Eumeces skiltonianus
Garden Slender Salamander Batrachoseps major
Gopher Snake Pituophis melanoleucus
Orange-throated Whiptail Cnemidophorus hyperythrus beldingi
Pacific Treefrog Hyla regilla
Pond Slider Pseudemys scripta
Red Coachwhip Masticophis flagellum
Red Rattlesnake Crotalus ruber
Red-legged Frog Rana aurora draytoni
San Diego Alligator Lizard Gerrhonotus multicarinatus
San Diego Horned Lizard Phrynosoma coronatum blainvillei
San Diego Night Snake Hypsiglena torquata
San Diego Ringneck Snake Diadophis punctatus similis
Side-blotched Lizard Uta stansburiana
Silvery Legless Lizard Aniella pulchra pulchra
Softshell Turtle Trionyx spp.
Southern Pacific Rattlesnake Crotalus viridis
Southwestern Blind Snake Leptotyphlops humilis
Southwestern Pond Turtle Clemmys marmorata pallida
Two-striped Garter Snake Thamnophis couchi hammondi
Western Fence Lizard Sceloporus occidentalis
Western Long-nosed Snake Rhinocheilus lecontei
Western Racer Coluber constrictor
Western Spadefoot Scaphiopus hammondi
Western Toad Bufo boreas





MAMMALS

Agile Kangaroo Rat Dipodomys agilis
Badger Taxidea taxa
Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus
Black Rat Rattus rattus
Black-tailed Jackrabbit Lepus californicus
Bobcat Lynx rufus
Botta's Pocket Gopher Thomomys bottae
Brush Rabbit Sylvilagus bachmani
Cactus Mouse Peromyscus eremicus
California Bat Myotis californicus
California Ground Squirrel Spermophilus beecheyi
California Leaf-nosed Bat Macrotus californicus
California Mouse Peromyscus californicus
California Pocket Mouse Perognathus californicus
California Vole Microtus californicus
Coyote Canis latrans
Deer Mouse Peromyscus maniculatus
Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus audubonii
Dusky-footed Woodrat Neotoma fuscipes
Grasshopper Mouse Onychomys torridus
Gray Fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus
Harvest Mouse Reithrodontomys megalotis
Hoary Bat Lasiurus cinereus
House Mouse Mus musculus
Little Pocket Mouse Perognathus longimembris pacificus
Long-legged Bat Myotis volans
Long-tailed Weasel Mustela frenata
Mountain Lion Felis concolor
Norway Rat Rattus norvegicus
Ornate Shrew Sorex ornatus
Pallid Bat Antrozous pallidus
Raccoon Procyon lotor
Red Bat Lasiurus borealis
Ringtail Bassariscus astutus
San Diego Pocket Mouse Perognathus fallux
Southern Mule Deer Odocoileus hemionus
Striped Skunk Mephitus mephitus
Townsend's Long-eared Bat Plecotus townsendii pallescens
Virginia Opossum Didelphis virginiana
Western Pipistrelle Pipistrellus hesperus
Western Spotted Skunk Spilogale putorius
 

 
 
   


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