Long Beach Historic Landmarks


Pictured above top left is the Hotel Broadlind, located on the corner of Broadway and Linden (that's how it got its name) and  top and bottom right are scenes from the city owned Rancho Los Alamitos.  If you want to hear first hand accounts about the earthquake that shook the city, visit the Rancho on a weekend when volunteers are sitting around, eager to talk about their memories of a day that changed the face of Long Beach. There's even a book for sale about the Long Beach earthquake. Pictured bottom left is the Villa Riviera. This building is home for the many residents who have purchased units that  overlook the Pacific Ocean or Ocean Boulevard. On a clear day, you can see all the way to downtown Los Angeles. Of special interest on this landmark are gargoyles.

LONG BEACH MUNICIPAL CODE 16.52.010 Jergins Trust Building, Pacific Coast Club, Villa Riviera, First Congregational Church, Rancho Los Alamitos and Rancho Los Cerritos.
16.52.020 Cooper Arms Apartments.
16.52.030 Drake Park/Willmore City Historic Landmark District.
16.52.040 Long Beach Community Hospital.
16.52.050 Scottish Rite Cathedral.
16.52.060 Insurance Exchange Building.
16.52.070 Recreation Park golf course clubhouse.
16.52.080 Bembridge House.
16.52.090 Cherry Avenue Lifeguard Station.
16.52.100 William Benjamin Dearborn Simmons Tracker Pipe Organ.
16.52.110 Dr. Rowan Building.
16.52.120 Long Beach Municipal Auditorium Mural.
16.52.130 Heartwell/Lowe House.
16.52.140 St. Regis Building.
16.52.150 Fire Maintenance Station No. 10.
16.52.160 Leonie Pray House.
16.52.170 The Skinny House.
16.52.180 First National Bank of Long Beach Building.
16.52.190 Henry Clock House.
16.52.200 The Artaban Apartments.
16.52.210 The Broadlind Hotel.

16.52.220 The Masonic Temple.
16.52.230 The Matlock House.
16.52.240 The Moore House.
16.52.250 The Olan Hafley House.
16.52.260 The Willmore Building.
16.52.270 The Lafayette Complex.
PAGE TWO Includes the following:
16.52.280 The Linden House.
16.52.290 The Termo Company Building.
16.52.300 The Home Market Building.
16.52.310 The Farmers and Merchants Bank Office Tower.
16.52.320 The Long Beach Professional Building.
16.52.330 Bixby Ranch House.
16.52.340 The Houser Building.
16.52.350 The Harriman-Jones Clinic.
16.52.360 The Breakers Hotel.
16.52.370 The Ocean Center Building.
16.52.380 The Adelaide M. Tichenor House.
16.52.390 The Californian Apartments.
16.52.400 The Crest Apartments.
PAGE THREE Includes the following: 16.52.410 The Blackstone Hotel
16.52.420 The Sovereign Apartments.
16.52.430 Windham House (The Lord Mayor's Inn).
16.52.450 The Barker Brothers Building.
16.52.460 The Buffums Autoport.
16.52.470 The Security Pacific National Bank Building.
16.52.480 The American Hotel.
16.52.490 The 312-316 Elm Avenue Commercial Building.
16.52.500 First United Presbyterian Church.
16.52.510 Walkers Department Store.
16.52.520 The Engine Company No. 8 Building.
16.52.530 The Golden House.
16.52.540 The Masonic Temple.
16.52.550 The Pacific Tower.
16.52.560 St. Anthony's Church.
16.52.570 St. Luke's Episcopal Church.
16.52.580 The First Church of Christ Scientist.
16.52.590 The Thrifty Drug/Famous Department Store.
16.52.600 453 Cedar Avenue.
16.52.610 629 Atlantic Avenue.
16.52.620 The Second Church of Christ Scientist.
16.52.630 The First Methodist Episcopal Church/Christian Outreach Appeal Building.
16.52.640 The Long Beach Airport Terminal.
16.52.650 The Long Beach Museum of Art.
16.52.660 The Harnett House.
PAGE Four Includes the following:
16.52.670 240 Long Beach Boulevard.
16.52.680 320 East Bixby Road.
16.52.690 The Hancock Motors Building.
16.52.700 The Cheney-Delaney Residence.
16.52.710 The James E. Porter Residence.
16.52.720 The Meeker Building.
16.52.730 278 Alamitos Avenue (skating rink).
16.52.740 The Recreation Park bandshell
16.52.750 The Coffee Pot Cafe.
16.52.760 The Chancellor Apartments.
16.52.770 The Kress Building.
16.52.780 The Gaytonia Apartment Building.
16.52.790 The Masonic Hall Commercial Building.
16.52.800 The Art Theater Building.
16.52.810 The Ambassador Apartment Building.
16.52.830 The Merrill Building.
16.52.840 The Flossie Lewis House.
PAGE FIVE Includes the following:
16.52.860 The Pressburg Residence.
16.52.870 The El Cordova/Rose Towers.
16.52.890 The Bank of Belmont Shore.
16.52.900 Castle Croydon.
16.52.910 The Ernest and Lillian McBride Home.
16.52.920 The Dolly Varden Hotel Rooftop Sign.
16.52.930 The Le Grande Apartments.
16.52.940 The Silver Bow Apartments.
16.52.950 Casa Aitken.
16.52.960 St. John's Missionary Baptist Church.
16.52.970 The James Beer Residence.
16.52.980 The Garvey House.
16.52.990 The Bay Hotel.
16.52.1000 The Ringheim/Wells House.
16.52.1010 The Kale House and attached Music Art Hall.
16.52.1020 The Foster & Kleiser Building.
16.52.1030 The Anna R. Brown Residence.
16.52.1040 The Butler Residence.
16.52.1050 The Long Beach Unity Church.
16.52.1060 The Packard Motors Building
16.52.1070 The American Legion Post #560 (Houghton Post)
16.52.1080 The Phillips House
16.52.1090 The 1163 Appleton House
16.52.2000 The 1169-75 Appleton Street House
16.52.2010 The Parsonage
16.52.2020 Esser House
16.52.2030 The Sunnyside Cemetery 16.52.010 Jergins Trust Building, Pacific Coast Club, Villa Riviera, First Congregational Church, Rancho Los Alamitos and Rancho Los Cerritos.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following buildings as historical landmarks in the City:

A. The Jergins Trust Building. 1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 120 East Ocean Boulevard, the structure, known first as the Markwell Building, was started in 1917 and the first six floors were completed in 1919. It received its present name when the Jergins Oil Company bought it, after which the remaining floors were added in 1929. It served various purposes during the years, housing offices of Standard Oil, a theater, several stores, municipal and superior courts, law offices and departments of municipal and county governments. It was frequently sold and resold, its leases sought until conditions in the 1950s made them less desirable. Yet the building has served as a Long Beach landmark, offering with its companion on the other side of the intersection a grand view looking down Pine Avenue toward the ocean. Its share in the history of Long Beach has been considerable, for historic cases have been discussed there, and won or lost in its courts, and business transactions have been consummated within its offices influencing the fate of Long Beach.
2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:
The committee would resist any changes in the exterior facade of the Jergins Trust that would interfere with the colorful "cake-like" art stone carvings that appear on the top floors of the building. We understand and were in agreement with the removal of the State Theatre marquee in that the present owners of the building are endeavoring to find a new use for that area of the structure. Cognizant of the problems for finding a new use for theaters, the Committee is aware that the owners hope to attract a banking facility within this area of the building. The Committee found upon a field trip to the site that the original arcade below the building is in excellent condition and would resist any attempt to do away with it; we would like to see the arcade reopened and used as it was originally used as a market center and boutique alley. We would like the paneling in the upstairs law offices preserved should the present lessees leave (though that is doubtful). We further recommend that the penthouse terrace be restored and used as an attraction to the building. We are interested in meeting the present owners and encouraging them in any restoration efforts.

B. The Pacific Coast Club. 1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 850 East Ocean Boulevard, the Club was founded in 1923, with the merger of the Petroleum Club and the Coast Athletic Club. Groundbreaking for a building started on June 9, 1925, and the cornerstone was laid on September 4, 1926; the Club was formally opened on October 26, 1926. The architects were Curlett and Beelman, although several individuals were involved with the structure and its decor. The Grand Hall with its decorations, the chandelier and the library were notable features. It was built by C. T. McGrew & Sons Construction Company with one son a charter member. The same company built the Press Telegram Building. At the dedication, President David Smith officially opened the club for hundreds of charter members, but he resigned within the year and the facility was conveyed to the Los Angeles Athletic Club in 1928. In 1961, the building was turned over to the Pacific Coast Club, Inc., with a new president, Wayne Ferrell, but seven months later the club was bankrupt. The building survived the earthquake with but a few cracks and survived vandalism and time to presently represent a monument to an era and a glory of the city of Long Beach. C. The Villa Riviera. 1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 800 East Ocean Boulevard, the Villa Riviera Hotel was constructed in 1929, second in height at that time only to the Los Angeles City Hall. Architect Richard D. King won a grand prize at an international contest for the design of the sixteen-story building. Its costs of construction were over two million dollars, at that time a large sum in building expenditures. Its architecture savors of the majestic Tudor Gothic, with a marked resemblance to the Italian and French Renaissance, all blended into a composite grace of line that overshadows any single decorative detail. At one time, Joseph M. Schenck of Twentieth Century-Fox and Norma Talmadge, then his wife, owned the hotel. It survived the earthquake with only plaster cracks which were easily repaired. With its height and its command of a view over the ocean to Catalina and over the city, the Villa Riviera is an eye-catching object for Long Beach.
2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:
The exterior of this building should be maintained at any cost! The gargoyles, intricate art stone carvings and other outer decorations should be reinforced should they
show signs of weakening. Any exterior painting or reroofing should be done only after Committee approval as to color and material. We would encourage the present color tones and would discourage a change of color for this towering pillar which stands as a gateway to the Ocean Boulevard scenic route currently in the planning process. Since the apartments are privately owned, the Committee will not make any recommendations beyond preserving the lobby, its fixtures and decorations.
D. The First Congregational Church. 1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at Third Street and Cedar Avenue, the church was built in 1914 by C. T. McGrew of Long Beach; the architectural design was by H. M. Patterson of Los Angeles. Its brick exterior is Italian Renaissance and its interior is noteworthy for its stained glass, paneling and wooden beams. It has been a landmark of Long Beach since the 1920s and a scene of notable social and cultural events. It has served as a memorial to Mr. and Mrs. Bixby who were so important for its construction and to Long Beach. The Italian Renaissance style conforms meaningfully with the contemporary surroundings of new structures. Although later additions and alterations have been made, these have been kept in close relation to the original style. It withstood the 1933 earthquake well; recent changes in building code regulations have forced the congregation to agree to the demolition of the educational facility and to construct new quarters. In all, the church itself as a cultural and social institution, the integrity of its architecture and decor, and its place in the city merits preservation as a landmark.
2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:
The Committee is aware that further interior changes are in order for this church so that it may present building code requirements. Regretfully, we understand that the existing stairwells - mahogany - will have to be replaced or covered. We would urge that the Planning and Building Department once more consider this recommendation in that we are aware that in some instances exceptions have been made for historical buildings. We feel the church has done an outstanding job in its own preservation effort. e.g., utilizing Pilgrim Hall materials in new construction. We would like to work with Dr. David Reed and his committee in any new restoration efforts in line with a new building presently under consideration adjacent to the church building. Our purpose here is only advisory and with the intent of offering any service we might have that would benefit the church. We would not like to see any further structural changes either in the outside or interior of the building. E. Rancho Los Alamitos. 1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 6400 East Bixby Hills Road, situated on the prehistoric Indian village site, known as Puvung-na, Rancho Los Alamitos is an excellent example of a late nineteenth century working ranch. The adobe walls, constructed by Juan Jose Nieto in 1806, serve as the interior foundation of the present day ranch home. Rancher Don Abel Stearns added a wing to the adobe home in 1842, to serve as his vaqueros' bunkhouse. After John Bixby became owner, this wing was converted to use as kitchen and servants' quarters. The last additions to the ranch house were made by his son, Fred Bixby, in 1925. In addition to its extensive gardens, buildings surrounding the house include horse barns, a working blacksmith shop, cow feeding and milking barns, chuck wagon, and many items of machinery, used in turn-of-the-century farming. This house is one of the few remaining structures in Southern California which began its existence during the Spanish colonial days. Its heritage represents the Spanish, Mexican and American eras of California history.
2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:
Located in the heart of one of the City's most prestigious residential areas, Bixby Hill, Rancho Los Alamitos lies nestled amidst seven and one-half acres of gardens and outer buildings that were part of its early life as a working ranch. The last additions were made to the house in 1925: none have taken place since. Every effort has been made to restore the interior dwelling to reflect life as it was when the Bixby family occupied the ranch house. The Committee favors retention of the existing seven acres of land to perpetuate the life of the site, to continue the upkeep of the existing gardens for tourists, to encourage tours of the outer buildings as an educational resource and to maintain the existing structure as an example of early ranch life in California. We would not anticipate further structural changes nor would we recommend them at this juncture. Should a necessity arise for alteration, the Committee would like to be consulted before any changes take place. F. Rancho Los Cerritos. 1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 4600 Virginia Road, the Rancho's history represents the Mexican and early American period of Long Beach history. It was the site of a Tibahangna Indian village where Manuel Neito constructed ranch quarters for the original 167,000 acre land grant from Governor Pedro Fages in 1784. In 1843, Jonathan Temple purchased the 27,000 acre Rancho Los Cerritos from the Neito heirs. In the early 1860s, severe droughts and floods decimated the operation of the Rancho and Temple sold it to the Flint Bixby and Company in 1866 for $20,000 in gold. Jonathan Bixby, Llewellyn's brother, managed the ranch until 1881 and the old adobe remained empty until 1931. In 1929, Llewellyn Bixby, Jr., nephew of Jonathan, purchased the ranch house and grounds around it and completed a massive renovation in 1931. In 1954, the city assumed responsibility for its preservation. The ranch is one of the few remaining examples of the early California Monterey Colonial Style, and its ownership history represents the development of the area from its earliest origins to the present.
2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:
Almost hidden from view at the end of a long, curving road, Rancho Los Cerritos and its beautiful hacienda and porch can be seen through the gate near the parking entryway in the heart of the Virgina Country Club residential district. The Committee recommends that the gardens and grounds of the Rancho be continually maintained as a strolling area for tourists and those persons who work at the Rancho itself. We recommend that the terraces and rear courtyards be upgraded since they are primarily walking areas, e.g., the brick walkways be maintained and the grass around the fountain area cared for. Regarding the interior, we would resist any structural changes, encouraging rather the maintenance of the beautiful floors, beam ceilings and library. The outer rooms around the courtyard are excellent historical areas offering a look at a world long gone. We would encourage preservation of the exhibit materials and would, of course, oppose any outer structural changes, e.g., roof materials, unless consulted as to the necessity thereof. (Ord. C-5479 § 1, 1979). 16.52.020 Cooper Arms Apartments.
Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63, and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city:

The Cooper Arms Apartments.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Long Beach entered upon the "million-dollar-a-month" building era in 1921. By 1923, that figure had doubled. That year construction commenced on the Cooper Arms Apartments, one of several skyscraper apartment houses that changed the skyline of Long Beach from a quiet village to that of a metropolitan city.

Located at 455 East Ocean Boulevard, the twelve-story own-your-own, comprising one hundred fifty apartments, was built of reinforced concrete and tile upon a lot that measured one hundred by two hundred two feet, allowing space for a garden that was the size of a regular city lot.

The property was owned by Larkin Cooper whose home and guest house once graced the present day site of the Fidelity Federal Plaza. Cooper gathered together the most prominent business figures of Long Beach to manage the Cooper Arms project. Among them, Nelson McCook, president and founder of the California National Bank; Colonel Walter J. Horne, partner in Van Lester & Horne, a real estate firm that developed downtown business blocks and residences; Vat Lester, Horne's partner whose successful real estate methods earned him the pseudonym "The Bungalow Merchant;" William Prisk, founder of the Independent Press Telegram; Dr. W. Harriman Jones, surgeon and director of the City National Building Company, and many others.

Their goal was to build the most luxurious cooperative apartment house in Long Beach. Early testimonials indicate they succeeded, comparing the Cooper Arms to the Biltmore in downtown Los Angeles and the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena.

The project was the sixth cooperative apartment house in Long Beach. Prices ranged from three thousand eight hundred dollars to seventeen thousand dollars per unit. The complex offered its tenants a wide variety of amenities: A Spanish loggia, domed ballroom and solarium atop the roof including a glass enclosed cafe; imported Italian terraza floors in the lobby and drawing room/lounge; art deco paneling, bronze doors and a number of other fine interior architectural details which enhanced the lobby and hallways. The basement provided receiving and storage rooms with individual trunk rooms; showers, lockers, dressing rooms and baths for bathers; billiard, smoking and recreation rooms were provided as was a driveway for autos at the rear of the building.

Exterior architectural features such as curved casement windows, columned balconies and carved artstone scrolls along the roofline all contribute to the art deco styling of the 1920s, so prevalent to Long Beach.

The Cooper Arms' historic associations lie in its status as one of the first cooperative ventures in apartment house living in the West; its relationship to the prominent businessmen of the day, and its value as an example of 1920s architecture in both its outer facade and interior detailing. Its twelve-story facade, as noted earlier, played a significant part in the changing face of Long Beach. The building's early days were distinguished by a lifestyle that once thrived in Long Beach and which may one day return. In that regard, the Cooper Arms is unique.

The obvious care and sense of responsibility of the owners of this building, those persons who own their apartments, is reflected throughout the structure in its orderly appearance and in the exceedingly expensive effort now being undertaken to bring the building up to meet Long Beach building codes.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The following guidelines and standards recommended by the Cultural Heritage Commission are adopted:

This twelve-story building is in remarkably fine condition. The building should remain intact, its interiors preserved, its first floor lounge/drawing room be carefully preserved to ensure the beautiful art deco decorations, and efforts be made to maintain the bronze elevator doors, marble floors, brass fittings and fixtures and graceful casement windows that are found throughout the interior building.

The garden already in good repair, should continue as a green area, since it is an outstanding feature of the building, almost an architectural detail in itself. (Ord. C-5523 § 1, 1979).

16.52.030 Drake Park/Willmore City Historic Landmark District.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63, and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the area known as Drake Park/Willmore City as a Historic Landmark District. The boundaries of the Drake Park/Willmore City Historic District are as follows:

A. North. From Park Court one hundred feet south of Anaheim Street, continuing west to the west side of the parcel at 1249 Loma Vista Drive; crossing to the south side of Loma Vista Drive at Virginia Court; continuing west to the property located at 1191 Loma Vista; then crossing to the north side of Loma Vista Drive to the railroad right-of-way and continuing west; then going south on the western side of the property located at 1077 Loma Vista to the north side of Loma Vista Drive.

West. Continuing south and curving around Loma Vista Drive to Oro Court; south on Oro Court to Seventh Street; east on Seventh Street to Magnolia Avenue; south on Magnolia Avenue to Fifth Street; west on Fifth Street to Crystal Court; north on Crystal Court to Sixth Street; west on Sixth Street to Nylic Court; south on Nylic Court to Fifth Street; east on Fifth Street to Daisy Avenue; south on Daisy Avenue for fifty feet; then east to Crystal Court; south on Crystal Court to the north side of Fourth Street.

South. The north side of Fourth Street from Crystal Court to Magnolia Avenue; then south to fifty feet south of the south side of Fourth Street (at the southern boundary of 356 Magnolia Avenue); then east to Cedar Avenue.

East. From fifty feet south of Fourth Street, north on Cedar Avenue to Fifth Street; then east to Park Court; continuing north on Park Court to one hundred feet south of Anaheim.

16.52.040 Long Beach Community Hospital.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63, and with the recommendation of the Planning Commission, the City Council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the City:

The Long Beach Community Hospital.

1. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 1720 Termino Avenue, the Long Beach Community Hospital first opened its doors to the public on July 15, 1924, and has since remained open twenty-four hours a day, every day, at the same location.

Community's existence is due to the efforts of concerned citizens who saw the need for a nonprofit hospital serving the eastern section of the City. A public fund drive, a grant of civic funds and a one dollar a month lease of City property culminated in the construction of the Spanish Colonial style building. The site chosen was a hill surrounded by farmland located at that time on the outskirts of Long Beach.

During the first five years of its existence, the one hundred twenty-five bed hospital was plagued with financial problems. Fillmore Condit, hospital founder and the first president of the Board of Trustees, frequently accompanied the Administrator to the bank to make up the payroll from his own funds. During his lifetime Mr. Condit (who also served a term as the City's Mayor) donated more than one hundred thousand dollars to Community Hospital.

At 5:55 p.m., March 10, 1933, Long Beach was shaken by an earthquake with a magnitude of 6.3 on the Richter scale. Under the guidance of Sarah A. Ruddy, RN, Hospital Administrator, Long Beach Community Hospital continued to serve the community, without lights, telephone service, water or heat, in tents on the hospital grounds. A total of one hundred twenty-five injured were treated the first night, ninety of them hospitalized. Damage to the hospital was so slight that patients were back in the hospital within twenty-four hours. An emergency clinic, set up for twenty-four hours a day the next ten days, treated more than five hundred patients who were casualties of the quake.

In 1958 the unique Hatfield Unit with its garden views was created and named after Howard Hatfield, the Administrator of that decade. With fifty beds it was the first convalescent unit ever built within the confines of a nonprofit private institution in California.

Following the population explosion of the 1950s, the community of Long Beach rallied to raise funds for local hospitals. As the direct result of the local bond issue, Community Hospital dedicated a new east wing in 1959 under the administration of Walter Oliver. A total of one hundred forty-eight beds and thirty-four bassinets were added bringing the licensed capacity to today's three hundred beds.

Today the two-story and basement structure of the original 1924 building contains the main entrance to the hospital and fairly well conceals the 1959 addition. A landscaped courtyard is entered through an arcade. Arcades also flank each side of the courtyard. A fountain, flowers and trees add to the historic scene created by stuccoed walls and red tile roofs.

Despite work done in 1958 bringing the building up to the then existing structural codes, Community Hospital is today involved in a major reconstruction project to bring the building up to current, more stringent codes. An investment of an estimated twelve and one-half million dollars for a new emergency department and restructuring of the original building must be made.

Structural reinforcement requires a unique design solution involving slant-drilled underpinning, shear walls, chasing exterior walls, and guniting. These efforts mean that Community Hospital will retain the distinction of being the only Long Beach hospital to operate from its original structure.

2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (Feb. 1978) are incorporated by reference.

The following guidelines and standards recommended by the Cultural Heritage Commission are adopted:

Exterior. The Termino Avenue facade is the special architectural importance of this building and therefore should be preserved. A certificate of appropriateness shall be granted for changes delineated on the construction drawings stamped by the State Department of Health Facilities Planning on February 1, 1979, and for normal maintenance and enhancement of the facade for the purposes of preservation and addition of architectural detail in keeping with the Spanish architecture.


16.52.050 Scottish Rite Cathedral.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63, and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city:

Scottish Rite Cathedral.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Location: 855 Elm Avenue. In 1924 Aubrey Rivers Parks announced his dream and plan for the Scottish Rite Temple. The Scottish Rite Bodies were to have their own home at the northwestern corner of Ninth Street and Elm Avenue.

The building was completed in August 1926 at the cost of five hundred thousand dollars, including original furnishings and equipment. The fully air conditioned Long Beach Scottish Rite Cathedral contains forty thousand eight hundred square feet of floor space, a new fifty thousand dollar pipe organ and portable console, twenty-seven stage sets and ninety-seven drops valued at three hundred fifty thousand dollars, stage lighting, closed circuit television and sound system in the Sanctuary. This landmark is a place for higher Masonic learning and attracts many instructors.

2. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (Feb. 1978) are incorporated by reference.

The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:

Exterior. The Elm Avenue facade is the special architectural statement of this building and therefore should be preserved. Normal maintenance of the facade for purposes of preservation shall receive a certificate of appropriateness. Any proposed alterations, remodeling or modernization of the Elm Avenue facade, however, shall be granted a certificate of appropriateness only for public safety reasons after adequate investigation has been made of alternate methods of correcting the safety hazards.

Proposed changes to the other three elevations of this structure shall be granted a certificate of appropriateness only if the changes would be in keeping with the architectural style and design and color motifs of the building.

Interior. Two interior spaces have extraordinary design importance and contribute significantly to the building as a cultural resource. The spaces are the entrance lobby and the main auditorium. These are richly decorated with hand-painted wall and ceiling designs which should be preserved. Certificates of appropriateness should be issued for normal maintenance of these spaces, including the wall and ceiling decorations, for the purposes of preservation in their present form.

16.52.060 Insurance Exchange Building.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63, and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city:

Insurance Exchange Building.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 205 East Broadway, this architecturally significant building was constructured at a cost of four hundred thousand dollars during the Long Beach building boom of the 1920s. It is art deco in style with noteworthy use of ornamental plaster and tile work.

Way and Lorne Middough, prominent businessmen and civic leaders from 1919 until their deaths in 1966 and 1963 respectively, commenced construction in late 1923. Their shop, "The Boys Shop," at 126 West Broadway was too small for their purposes. The original plan was to build a two story structure to accommodate their needs. They were asked to raise the height to eight stories to accommodate the small claims and superior courts. This they did.

The bas-relief, originally around the entire front of the structure, featured children's sports scenes. The tiles and friezes along the architectural lines of the building complements the bas-reliefs. Three and three-fourths of these scenes remain as original. The Middough brothers were actively involved for boys and their needs. A gymnasium was included in the building because of this concern for boys and their love of sports.

The building was completed in 1925. It was featured in newspaper articles and magazine supplements in the 1920s and 1930s as one of the outstanding new landmark buildings of downtown Long Beach.

The courts moved to the Jergins Trust Building when the two additional floors were added to that building in the late 1920s. Without a guaranteed income for the building, the financial problems of the 1929 crash made it necessary to sell the building.

In 1931 the building was sold to Wayne H. Fisher, a Los Angeles developer. From this time on the building became known as the Insurance and Exchange Building.

In 1932 the name of the Boys Shop was changed to Middough Meier and was operated by Way Middough and R. Troy Meier.

During the war, the building was used as a mess hall for the armed forces.

The present owner of the building, Mr. James Compton, purchased the building in 1965.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior Feb. 1978) are incorporated by reference.

The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:

Exterior. The facade and art deco style and ornamentation are the architectural importance of the building. The remaining bas-relief scenes should be preserved, the ornamental tiles, columns and friezes should be preserved. Normal maintenance of the facade for purposes of preservation shall receive a certificate of appropriateness.

Interior. The entrance lobby to 205 East Broadway is significant in its art deco designs. These designs should be retained and preserved. Certificates of appropriateness should be issued for normal maintenance of this space, including the wall, floor and ceiling designs, for the purposes of preservation in their present form.

The columns and decoration and ceiling designs on the second floor should be preserved. A certificate of appropriateness should be issued for normal maintenance of these columns and ceiling designs for purposes of preservation. (Ord. C-5649 § 1, 1980).

16.52.070 Recreation Park golf course clubhouse.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63, and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city:

Recreation Park Golf Course Clubhouse.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 5000 East Anaheim Street, the Recreation Park golf course clubhouse is one of the few civic buildings remaining and represents the only recreation building constructed prior to 1933. The total area, including golf courses and Recreation Park, was purchased from the Alamitos Land Company (two hundred sixty acres) and the San Gabriel River Improvement Company (one hundred forty acres) with a bond issue of nine hundred thousand dollars in 1923. Earlier a golf course existed on the site, and that club became the Virgina Country Club with the termination of the lease. A clubhouse was constructed in 1925 which was moved across Seventh Street to become the clubhouse for the new nine-hole course constructed in 1929. The present Recreation Park golf course clubhouse was constructed in 1929 for a cost of fifty thousand dollars.

In 1925 the course held art annual open which continued until suspended during the Depression (and also in World War II). Winners of the Long Beach Open included: Bill Mellhorn, Lee Diegel, Tommy Armour, James Kirkwood, Walter Hagen and Olin Dutra. Associated with the clubhouse are many festivities related to the course and to civic events. A large room was used for dances and social events which is currently in excellent condition, except that the gas jets have been removed from the fireplace.

The golf course was reconstructed in 1935, dedicated in May, which conforms roughly to its present configuration. It became a longer course (six thousand five hundred yards, par seventy-two) and more fitting for PGA play.

The club was under the Long Beach recreation commission from the formation of this body in 1929 until after World War II when there was a reorganization. The chairman of this commission for many years was an outstanding civic leader, Clyde Doyle; and prominent individuals have been members of the commission during the years. Clyde Doyle was a Long Beach attorney with considerable influence in civic affairs and development.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (Feb. 1978) are incorporated by reference as guidelines.

The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted as guidelines:

The clubhouse's exterior should be preserved as present which conforms to the original design of 1929. Particular emphasis is placed on the preservation of the veranda and its colonial style decor and the present color. The adjoining starter's building may be changed without affecting the main structure since it was an addition. Other buildings, if necessary, can be constructed, but if attached or closely proximate, should conform to the original design.

The interior portions of the clubhouse may be modified to suit lessors or the park department with the exception of the main dining/social room where the beam ceilings and the fireplace must be preserved and restored to their original purpose and redesigned and enlarged. Both the men's and women's locker rooms and showers can be redesigned and refurbished to provide more suitable service; this work can be done without disturbing the original design.

Other portions of the interior can be modified: restaurant, pro shop and the second floor facilities.

In addition to those items mentioned above, colonnades, beams, decoration on the exterior, brick porch, gables with decoration, and window appearance should be preserved. (Ord. C-5652 § 1. 1980).

16.52.080 Bembridge House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city:

Bembridge House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 953 Park Circle, Bembridge House was completed in 1906 as the home for Stephen and Josephine Green of Seattle and faces the 1.9 acre Knoll Park (Drake Park) given to the city in 1904 by the Seaside Water Company. It is one of the last Victorian structures still standing in Long Beach and lures many people to the structure as well as the adjacent park.

Following the death of Mr. Green in 1912, the home has had seven different owners. In 1918, the home was purchased by the late Thomas M. and Hazel Rankin of Cambridge, Nebraska, and the daughter, Dorothy (Mrs. Charles) Bembridge, occupies the home to this date. The structure itself is a two and one-half story Queen Anne Victorian residence with an asymmetrical composition consisting of a high pitched roof and multiple gables extending on the facade and sides of the house. The primary exterior material is horizontal board painted grey-blue with a white trim. Five double sash windows flanked by paired columns adorn the second story facade. A triangular pediment covers the main entry while double columns adorn the porch. A corner tower with conical roof projects from the second story above the circular portion of the porch. The original windows remain, many with leaded transoms and moldings. A two story carriage house adorns the same lot. A glass sun porch was added in 1924 and the home was reroofed in 1966, which might have destroyed the home had it not been for the care taken in presoaking the shingles nine times to make them fire retardant.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (Feb. 1978) are incorporated by reference.

The following guidelines and standards recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted: 1. The exterior of the home and carriage house be maintained in their existing condition and that the present color scheme be maintained;
2. Maintain existing interior as structurally dictated. Interior functions and decor may vary as per original planning intent.
a. In the entrance hall, the landing with Tiffany windows should remain,
b. The second landing leading to the second floor should remain as is, in order to preserve windows and staircase.
c. In the living room, the fireplace and mantel should remain,
d. In the dining room, the sideboard, china closet and Tiffany windows should remain; 16.52.090 Cherry Avenue Lifeguard Station.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located on the beach at the foot of Cherry Avenue, this lifeguard station is a most charming landmark for the many beach goers and inhabitants of the bluff top neighborhood that parallels the seashore. Resting on a raised foundation that is functional for the storing of equipment for saving lives (dories, paddle boards, power boats, etc.), the two and a half story clapboard structure is basically rectangular in shape. The hexagonal lookout and clock tower rests above a low pitch spanish gable roof. The east and west facades are distinguished by the shiplike portholes, catwalks, and entrance ramp that leads to the station's working quarters.

The Cherry Avenue Lifeguard Station was first constructed at the foot of Linden Avenue to replace the Lifeguard Headquarters that was washed away along with the Pine Avenue pier during a bad storm. It was moved to Cherry Avenue in 1961 (est). It was designated and built by the city in 1938. It represents the beach style of the 1930's better than any remaining public structure in the city. The bottom floor of the building will be used as a lifeguard service museum.

The Long Beach Lifeguard Service is the oldest city-owned service of this type on the west coast. It was the first service to operate a power boat in their operations, use a radio communication system, use dories and torpedo cons, and bring water safety instruction to the classroom. Many memorabilia will be displayed in the Cherry Avenue Lifeguard Station Historic Landmark.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (February, 1978), as amended, are incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:

The Cherry Avenue Lifeguard Headquarters Building shall be restored in the manner portrayed on drawings numbered B-3140 in the files of the Long Beach department of public works. Future maintenance of the structure which is found to be in keeping with the architectural style illustrated on these drawings shall receive a certificate of appropriateness from the cultural heritage committee.

The bottom floor of the structure shall be used for public display of memorabilia of the Long Beach Lifeguard Service. Organization and maintenance of the displays shall be the responsibility of others and periodic changes thereto shall not require a certificate of appropriateness. Abandonment of the displays or conversion of the display area to other uses, if proposed in the future, shall require a certificate of appropriateness.

16.52.100 William Benjamin Dearborn Simmons Tracker Pipe Organ.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located within the Los Altos United Methodist Church at 5950 Willow Street in the city, this organ arrived in San Francisco on the heels of the Gold Rush days. It has state-wide significance in that historians believe it to be the oldest Tracker-type church instrument extant west of the Mississippi. It was first played in 1852 after its journey around the Horn in a clipper ship. It was built in Boston, Massachusetts. It served in two locations in San Francisco, survived the 1906 earthquake and is of such quality of construction that there is every reason to believe it can be played for another one hundred thirty years or more. With such a past as well as this hope for the future, it brings significance to Long Beach. In addition to its history, it had an illustrious builder. William Benjamin Dearborn Simmons of Boston had been apprenticed to Thomas Appelton, a noted organ builder, until 1845. He then formed his own company in partnership with Thomas McIntyre. Simmons died in 1876, aged 53. He is credited with bringing several European Stops to organ building in the United States. The premier recital of this restored organ commanded news items in forty publications across the United States. It played to a full house and the audience included hundreds of organists. The Organ Historical Society has placed a plaque in the Sanctuary recognizing the organ as authentic and significant. Its place in history as an introduction of culture during the excessive era of the Gold Rush, its distinguished builder, its place as a classical specimen of its kind, its fine craftsmanship and promise for the future make it a valuable cultural landmark in our community and state.

16.52.110 Dr. Rowan Building.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 201-209 Pine Avenue in the city, the Rowan Building brought an example of Art Deco architecture to the city in a truly elegant manner. The extensive use of materials, pattern and livework made the structure a true showcase of the style originated by the Ecole de Beaux-Arts. Although other examples of this style exist on other highrise buildings in the area, none are found on a building of this scale or with the elaborate detailing and use of materials which were incorporated in this building. Located in the center of the commercial area of the city, this building originally afforded a home for Dr. Rowan (the father of Southern California credit dentistry), and for Nisley Shoes which was the "best women's shoe store in the area." It was less expensive to buy a new set of dentures than it was to purchase a pair of women's shoes at the exclusive Nisley's according to advertising which appeared in late 1930.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (February, 1978), as amended, are incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:

The significance of this Art Deco building is important to the city because it portrays the environment in an era of history characterized by a distinctive architectural style.

The certificate of appropriateness shall be granted for changes delineated in the Environmental Impact Report number ERR-73-80, Negative Declaration ND-60-80, written by the city planning department, environmental division, June 18, 1981.

Normal maintenance of the facade shall preserve and/or enhance the Art Deco architecture.

Proposed changes to the exterior elevations of the structure shall be reviewed in accordance with the procedures set forth in Section 2.63.070 relating to the certificate of appropriateness. (Ord. C-5787 § 1(b), 1981).

16.52.120 Long Beach Municipal Auditorium Mural.

A. Location, Descriptions and Reasons for Designation. Located on Third Street at Locust Avenue, the height of the tile mosaic is 37 feet, 9-7/8 inches; width 22 feet, 8 inches; area 802.40 square feet. The medium employed is brilliantly colored glazed semi-vitreous tile set in waterproof cement on a reinforced concrete wall. Exclusive of the narrow border, the largest size of tile in the great picture proper is l3/16 inch square by 3/8 inches thick. The number of pieces of tile in the picture is estimated at more than 466,000. The weight of the tiles is approximately 3,072 pounds. Thirty thousand pounds of mortar and cement were used for backing and filling the grout lines between the tiles. The following account depicting the "recreational" theme of the mural is from a January 18, 1970 issue of Southland Sunday. "It is a beach scene with boats sailing the blue ocean in the background and white clouds drifting overhead. On the sandy beach in the mid-area and on the green grass in the foreground are men, women and children enjoying other forms of Long Beach recreation - surfing, swimming, sunbathing, fishing, picnicking, playing horseshoes, ball and croquet. A sailor and his young wife admire their baby. A speaker voices her opinion on the `spit and argue' platform."

B. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Charges. The preservation of the Long Beach Mural shall follow the techniques and methods outlined in a report prepared by a consultant for the redevelopment agency in the city of Long Beach. The report deals specifically with the treatment, maintenance procedures, and repair of the tiles and grout holding the mural in place.

A copy of the report shall be kept on file in the Office of Long Range Planning, Department of Planning and Building, 5th Floor, City Hall. (Ord. C-5904 § 1, 1982).

16.52.130 Heartwell/Lowe House.
A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation.

The Heartwell/Lowe House is a Colonial Revival structure located at 2505 East 2nd Street, just outside of the Bluff Park Historic District. It was constructed in 1919.

This symmetrical two story, 2,366 square foot, Colonial Revival structure is rectangular in shape, has a low hip composition roof with a swept attic vent, and a header bond patterned chimney with sheet metal sheathing above the roof line. The exterior wall material is horizontal shiplap siding. The second story double hung windows are all one and two sash (the upper sashers are vertically divided with 4 panes each). The lower story windows are plate glass on the front facade and single sash double hung windows on all of the other sides. The front recessed entry is flanked by glass side panels (one on each side) and is covered by an open porch supported by round columns. The open porch doubles as a widow's walk/sun deck trimmed by a delicate wood rail with decorative corner posts. The entry to this area is a french door with glass side panels. The structure rests on a concrete foundation. The back yard is defined by a brick wall connected to the detached garage with a 532 square foot apartment over it. The dining room was enlarged in 1960 (rear).

In designating the Heartwell/Lowe House as an historic landmark, the following specific criteria have been found to exist in this structure:

It possesses a significant character, interest or value attributable to the development, heritage or cultural characteristics of the city, the southern California region, the state or the Nation or if it is associated with the life of a person significant in the past;

It embodies those distinguishing characteristics of an architectural-type or engineering specimen;

It is a part of or related to a distinctive area and should be developed or preserved according to a specific historical, cultural or architectural motif; and

It represents an established and familiar visual feature of a neighborhood or community due to its unique location or specific distinguishing characteristic.


The following standards are intended "to protect, enhance and perpetuate" the above landmark established by the cultural heritage committee per the Cultural Heritage Ordinance (No. C-5364) of the city of Long Beach.

The following standards and guidelines will deal with both the interior and exterior of the structure. 1. Exterior - the following features shall be preserved: a. The overall symmetry of the architectural style;
b. The front porch, columns, and widow's walk/sun deck and decorative railing;
c. The horizontal shiplap siding;
d. The chimney with its sheet metal sheathing;
e. The existing door and window shapes, sizes, materials, and placement; and
f. As well as the existing roof line, shape, and swept attic vent. 2. Interior - the following features shall be preserved: a. The hardwood stairway, doors, door frames, built-in cabinets, and any other hardwood "decorative" trim;
b. The existing bathroom fixtures and ceramic tile;
c. As well as the decorative fireplace in the living room. 16.52.140 St. Regis Building.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: The St. Regis Building.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 1030 East Ocean Boulevard in the city of Long Beach, the St. Regis Apartment Building is a seventy-six unit, eight-story, brick and masonry high rise structure resting on the ocean front bluff at Ocean Boulevard and Second Place. The penthouse that comprises the eighth floor is rather simple in design compared to the rich architectural components that work together to form the overall Greek motif. An example of such is the ionic entablature that rims the seventh floor. Part of this decoration is a large triangular pediment and boxed cornice which are both detailed with oversized dentils. Symmetrically placed above the main entry on the sixth floor is a shallow balcony with a masonry spoke design, all supported by cement brackets. The flat columns that rise above this are capped by voluted capitals.

The St. Regis Apartment Building is architecturally significant to Long Beach because it is a rare example of the Greek Revival style on this large of a scale. It also represents an example of the early high rise apartment construction along the coastal bluff.

The main entry is unique. The large platform marble stairs rise into the recessed entry that is characterized by a semi-elliptical arch with a keystone. Flanking the entrance on both sides are round columns next to windows that have molded arch trim. While the upper stories are brick with a header bond pattern, the first floor is constructed in cement block and is decorated with a horizontal pattern that radiates from the larger windows. The round columns that support the second story balcony/porch have large bracket type capitals. The balcony rail is made of masonry spindle rails with large square corner posts. The name of the building is boldly imprinted along the center of the balcony. The entrance off of Ocean Boulevard is similar in design, but the facade is dominated by a fire escape that traverses its way down to the Street.

With the exception of a few new window frames and aluminum awnings, the original exterior of the building is intact. The interior of the building has been changed. The larger changes include the moving of apartment walls and/or the combining of two units into one.

16.52.150 Fire Maintenance Station No. 10.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: Fire Maintenance Station No. 10.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Fire Station No. 10, located at 1445 Peterson Street in the city of Long Beach, is a sizable rectangular structure capped by a large mansard roof. The exterior siding is brick that has been stuccoed. It rests on a concrete foundation. The front recessed truck entry is distinguished by a decorative gable. The large windows are, all multi-paned. It was constructed in 1925. The roof was partially damaged by a tornado in 1936. (It has since been repaired.)

The importance of the Long Beach fire department to the development of the city is amplified by the character of the city. Oil and gas production and shipping both from Signal Hill and the harbor area make fire prevention and suppression critical elements in the city's healthy development. In addition, the port of Long Beach presents special problems for a fire department. So preserving the city's oldest remaining station, a shop and many pieces of equipment, especially on the site of the city's first drill school and training tower, makes a significant contribution to preserving the heritage of the city.

Beyond that, the contribution of the city fire department to the development of firefighting techniques in the west and the nation are represented on this site. The Long Beach fire department was the first one on the west coast to use mechanized equipment while others depended on man or horse drawn equipment. In addition, a valve that allows firefighters to switch from one water source to another without interrupting the water supply directed at a fire was developed by the local fire department and named after its inventor (the Lucas valve). This valve is now in use by fire departments all over the world.

Further significance is given this fire station location because of the many examples of firefighting equipment that are stored in the building. This collection of firefighting equipment brought together at the expense and time of the Long Beach firefighters historical society, includes the following engineering specimens: 1. Equipment. Original Long Beach 1902 hand cart. This being one of two purchased by Long Beach.
2. 1923 Seagraves Aerial Ladder Truck. Original purchased by city, June 1923. Retired in 1949 and sold to the city of Visalia. Fireman purchased it in 1977 and brought it back to Long Beach.

3. 1926 Ahren's Fox Pumper. Seven hundred fifty gallons per minute pumper purchased in 1926 and retired in 1948. Fireman purchased from Mack Truck by paying trade in price on a new pumper.

4. 1935 G.M.C. Squad Wagon purchased for $1,254.31 in 1935. This was purchased in 1981 by Tom Stewart Insurance and given to the historical society.

5. Purchased in 1961 by our association from the movie studios, two pieces of equipment, the same as used by Long Beach in the very early days 1905 to 1913. These both being horse drawn.

6. 1905 Amoskeag Steam Pumper.

7. 1894 Robinson Hose Wagon.

8. In addition to these major pieces of equipment, the station houses many small artifacts such as a unique collection of photographs, fire buckets, helmets, nozzles, etc.
16.52.160 Leonie Pray House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: The Leonie Pray House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 4252 Country Club Drive, in the city of Long Beach, this English Tudor mansion is one of the most architecturally significant residential structures in Long Beach. Its scale, size, and detail is unmatched in the city.

The house was designed and constructed by William E. Babb in 1927. Mr. Babb was a prominent Long Beach businessman who came to Long Beach in 1907 as the manager of the phone company. He later resigned that post to engage in building contracting. Shortly before oil was discovered on Signal Hill, Mr. Babb, with other local builders, had completed plans for an eleven-acre residential project at Signal Hill. The project was abandoned when oil was discovered and, consequently, Messrs. Babb and others received large oil royalties.

In 1929 the house was purchased by Russell Pray, attorney at law. The following history was excerpted from the Long Beach Blue Book, by Walter H. Case: RUSSELL H. PRAY Russell H. Pray is a well known and successful lawyer of Long Beach, who has practiced here since 1922. His first association in Long Beach was with Swaffield and Swaffield and in 1923 he became a member of the firm of Swaffield, Swaffield & Pray. In 1924 he took up practice alone and has so continued ever since. His suite of offices is located in the Security Building and his staff consists of three additional lawyers.
Mr. Pray was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on March 8, 1892, the son of Alvah J. Pray and Laura Elizabeth (Trowbridge) Pray. He was educated in the public schools of Columbus, Ohio, and entered Ohio State University in 1910. His law course was taken at the University of Michigan, which he completed in 1915. His degrees are A. B. and LL. B. After graduating he took a position with the American Telephone and Telegraph Company at Kansas City and for a time became a reporter on a Kansas City newspaper under Burris Jenkins. He went back to the law in 1917, in which year he was admitted to the bar in Missouri, taking up practice in the firm of Harding, Murphy, Deatherage and Harris. In 1918 he enlisted in the United State Army as a private in the Infantry: later was promoted to Sergeant Major and then to First Lieutenant and assigned later as General Staff Officer commissioned in the Judge Advocate General's Department. He was later made Captain and served in France with the Army, remaining in the Regular Army until 1920. In October, 1920, he resigned his Army Commission and engaged in the practice of law with an American firm in Paris, where he remained until the fall of 1921. During this time he matriculated at the Sorbonne University in Paris and in November of 1921 married Mrs. Pray, formerly Leonie Petuya, a native of France who was attending school in Paris. In December of 1921 Mr. Pray came to California and in the following February was admitted to the bar in California and later came to Long Beach.

Mr. Pray is noted as an able trial lawyer and as a hard worker in his profession. During the last twenty years he has been engaged in many important cases, both in the Trial and Appellate Courts of this State. Mr. Pray was admitted to the United States Supreme Court and the bar of the District of Columbia in 1921. He has been particularly active and interested in the guidance and encouragement of younger lawyers entering his profession.

Well connected fraternally, Mr. Pray is a member of the Masonic Order, being a Knight Templar of the York Rite and a 32nd Degree member of the Scottish Rite, and a Shriner. He also belongs to the Sons of the Revolution, the Sons of the American Revolution, the Alliance Francaise, Paris Post No. 1 and Peterson Post No. 27 of the American Legion, Delta Tau Delta, Academic, and Phi Alpha Delta, legal, Fraternities. He is a member of the Virginia County Club, the Pacific Coast Club, Long Beach Bar Association, Los Angeles Bar Association, California State Bar Association and the American Bar Association.

Russell H. Pray died after a brief illness in 1971. He was 79, Mrs. Leonie Pray still owns the house.
16.52.170 The Skinny House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: The Skinny House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 708 Gladys Avenue in the city of Long Beach, this three story, eight hundred sixty square feet, half-timber expression of Old English Tudor architecture exterior is compressed onto a ten foot by fifty foot residential lot which was created by an oversight in a real estate transaction at the corner of Gladys Avenue and Seventh Street. It was acquired by Newton Rummond in payment for a one hundred dollar debt in 1931 - in the depth of the depression. Friends said it was too small to be useful; Rummond declared he could build a home on it; a friend dared him to do so - and he did. It was built by a group of unemployed craftsmen who gained employment from the publicity this created when it was completed in 1932. Thousands toured the home where the craftsmen's names were displayed by their handiwork. The house's fame spread and it was featured in Ripley's Believe-It-Or-Not as the nation's narrowest home. Visitors included such notables as Walt Disney and have continued by the thousands at open houses held by a succession of owners over the half century. Occupants have routinely lauded the layout and design as being comfortable and convenient far beyond what would be expected in eight hundred sixty square feet on a thirty-eight foot by ten foot footprint. In 1959 when it was discovered that the house had leaned four inches north, it was straightened to vertical again.

16.52.180 First National Bank of Long Beach Building.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: The First National Bank of Long Beach Building.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 101 Pine Avenue in the City of Long Beach, the First National Bank of Long Beach Building is a large rectangular structure with a flat roof. There are commercial offices over the first floor bank and other commercial uses. There is a cornice at roof height, broken pediments adorn all six floor windows and a decorative horizontal bank connects them all. Above first floor all windows are double hung and siding is brick. There are exposed wrought iron fire escapes at both street sides. The corner of the building is broken into three planes. Storefronts vary in treatment. The siding is tile, wood and brick. At corner on third plane are two pilasters. On roof at corner is a large bell tower with clock face. It has four sides, vaulted arches, classical detailing with variation of a hooded or swept roof and a flag pole on roof.

In 1906 the building that currently stands on the northwest corner of First and Pine was opened as the home, on the ground floor, of the First National Bank of Long Beach. When that bank was originally organized in 1900, it was the town's second bank. By 1907 it had five hundred thousand dollars in capital stock, a one-hundred-thousand-dollar surplus and one million two hundred fifty thousand dollars in assets. The upper stories of the building were rented to physicians, attorneys and other tenants.

In 1920 the First National Bank moved to new offices at Fourth and Pine and the California National Bank moved from its original home at First and Pine. Upper stories of the building continued to be occupied by a variety of tenants. In 1927, the Bank of America acquired the California National Bank, and the ground floor at First and Pine became a branch of that bank. The name Bank of America can still be seen on the west face of the building.

City building permits indicate that the Bank of America employed the Capital Company to do thirty-five thousand dollars worth of remodeling on the building in 1938. Perhaps that is when the blue marble was attached to the first floor exterior.

There is some doubt whether the Bank of America ever owned the building. That bank's primary location in Long Beach was at Fourth and Pine. During the 1920's, and perhaps later, the building's official name was Metropolitan Building.

B. General Guidelines and Standards for Any Changes. The "Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings" prepared by the Secretary of the Interior (February, 1978), as amended, are incorporated by reference, and the following additional guidelines and standards as recommended by the cultural heritage committee are adopted:

Any alterations, modifications or repair of the First National Bank of Long Beach Building shall he done so in keeping with their historic character, and shall conform to the following outline for various proposed rehabilitation activities: 1. Structural. a. The existing feature consists of a six story load bearing masonry structure, built of brick with a steel frame and wood floors. The floors are nailed and/or bolted to the walls and steel members. The floors are in varying condition, ranging from poor to good. The walls are laid up with lime mortar and are in generally fair condition. The roof is of wood and is of joist and purlin construction. It is in poor to fair condition.
b. Proposed work will involve extensive structural reinforcing. A steel bond beam will be placed at each floor level, and it will be anchored into the load-bearing masonry on the interior. Three sheer walls will also be placed into the interior, in the area of the original light well or atrium. Plywood sheathing will be utilized as a sheer diaphragm on the floors. The roof will be repaired and replaced where necessary. Skylights will also be placed into the upper story level in locations relative to original light wells. Possible construction of an exterior sheer wall on the rear elevations may be necessary. These elevations are not, however, of primary architectural significance, and are not visible from the commercial intersection at First Street and Pine Avenue. 2. Windows. a. The existing windows from the second to six story levels are of wood construction. They are of the double-hung sash type with chains. A number of the windows are in poor condition due to water damage, warping and dry rot.
b. Proposed work will involve the repair of windows where possible. Several of the windows will be replaced by duplicates of the originals, and all will have clear glass. Plans incorporate the potential use of awnings, and historical photographs indicate that this is appropriate and in accordance with the original exterior appearance. 3. Exterior/Cleaning. a. The present exterior from the two to six story levels consists of yellow pressed brick with cast, stone, and terra cotta trim. The exterior is in generally good condition.
b. Commercial use of the structure requires the cleaning of the exterior wall surface. This will be carried out with mild detergents and soft bristle brushes using a low-pressure water rinse. The trim will be repaired and patched where necessary to prevent long-term water damage. 4. Mechanical/Plumbing/Electrical. a. The present features consist largely of non-original equipment. It includes, a natural gas engine with a four pipe chilled water system, an electric elevator of 1950's vintage, an electrical system dating from the same period, and a vertical plumbing system dating from 1906 to the 1950's. The mechanical and plumbing systems are in poor condition, while the electrical system is in relatively good condition.
b. Proposed work will involve the reworking of the elevator cables and the period restoration of the elevator cab. The electrical system will be repaired and the majority of the existing feature will be utilized as is. An entirely new plumbing and air conditioning system will be installed. 5. Typical Floor Plan 2 - 6 Story Levels. a. The existing feature consists of double box corridors with perimeter offices. Extant offices are extremely diverse in size as a result of extensive prior remodeling. The offices are in generally poor condition, although some original woodwork is extant.
b. Proposed work will consist of lobby areas at each floor level with an interior aisle providing access to restroom areas. The development of office spaces will be left to individual tenants. 6. Stairwells/Circulation. a. The existing circulation plan consists of two stairwells. The first, located off the first floor lobby, leads to all upper floors and to the roof. It consists of metal and marble construction at the first floor level and is of wood construction above. The second, located in the extreme southwest corner of the building, is of wood construction and it leads to the sixth story level only.
b. Proposed work will connect the two stairwells at each upper floor by a one corridor system. The two stairwells will remain in their present location and will be repaired as necessary. The south stairwell will be enlarged for fire exiting purposes. 7. Commercial Space. a. The existing feature consists of a vacant commercial banking area with basement vaults, and additional commercial frontage at the northern end of the Pine Avenue street level facade. The banking area and vaults have been largely unaltered with the exception of new flooring and counter space. The original ceiling in the banking area, and the furnishings and vaults in the basement area are virtually intact. The commercial frontage along Pine Avenue has, however, been extensively remodeled, and retains little of the original architectural integrity.
b. Proposed work will restore and repair the banking area and basement vaults as necessary. The space will be divided between commercial, banking and restaurant activities. All extant historical and architectural features of significance will be retained. A sheer wall will be placed at the dividing line of the restaurant and banking areas. 8. Lobby. a. The extant feature consists of a heavily remodeled space. Some of the original tile flooring and cast detailing remains, although much of the architectural fabric was damaged by the 1950's installation of a drop ceiling.
b. The plaster detailing in the lobby will be refabricated and restored, where possible, to duplicate the original. A substantial portion of the original ceiling remains, but it will be necessary to recast the majority of plaster detailing. The tile floor will be replaced with a more serviceable tile or marble covering. Elevator doors and lighting fixtures will also be fabricated in context with period pieces. One column, which is directly in front of the elevator doorway, may be removed for more efficient circulation. In addition, the north wall of the lobby may be extended to provide for a more usable space. 9. Street Level Facade. a. The present feature consists of a I939 remodeling of the original feature. The additions, although well done, are in an incompatible architectural style. The original corner entrance has also been blocked in, and the original showcase windows removed. The commercial frontage on the northern portion of the Pine Avenue frontage has also been remodeled.
b. The original showcase windows will be replaced through the use of historic photographs. This will involve the removal of the present 1939 facade, the refabricating of the building base and the installation of appropriate glass and detailing. Original materials, such as marble, metal and cast detailing will be utilized where they are known to have existed. If this information is not available, then the restoration will involve the use of materials common to the period. The commercial alterations at the northern end of the Pine Avenue facade will also be removed and the exterior restored to its original condition. 10. Entry Areas. a. There are four major entry areas. The Pine Avenue commercial entries, the main entrance leading to the lobby, the main banking entrance, and the auxilIary fire exit located on First Street. With the exception of the First Street entry all of the original doors have been replaced. In addition, the original corner entrance has been entirely removed.
b. The proposed work will involve the rebuilding of the original corner entrance. It will also involve the fabricating of brass doorways for all of the major entry areas. Wood doorways will be used where appropriate and when allowed by fire code. Marble steps and brass handrails will duplicate the originals. 11. Clock Tower/Parapet. a. The original parapet has been entirely removed from the Pine Avenue and First Street elevations. The clock tower is built of wood and tin with steel bracing. It is in generally good condition, but structural reinforcing is necessary.
b. Proposed work will involve the replacement of the parapet to duplicate the original. In this manner the original "balance" of the entire facade may be restored. In addition, the clock tower will be repaired and structurally reinforced with steel ties. The parapet and tower will then be painted to reflect the color of the brick wall surface.
No environmental changes shall be allowed unless a certificate of appropriateness has been applied for and approved by the cultural heritage committee or by the city planning commission upon appeal, authorizing such environmental changes. (Ord. C-6026 § 1, 1984). 16.52.190 Henry Clock House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: Henry Clock House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 4242 Pine Avenue, the Henry Clock House is a "Monterey Revival" style house, constructed in 1933, and designed by Kirtland Cutter.

The house has a floor area of five thousand two hundred thirty-three square feet and has an irregular floor plan consisting of an attached triple car garage at the south end with a swimming pool off of the living room near the side yard on Locust Avenue. It is a two-story structure with a Monterey style balcony and decorative wood rafter supports and railing. The lower floor has stucco siding with the second story clad with board and batten wood siding. It has a red clay tile hip roof, fireplace and a brick wall surrounding the garage entry. The double-hung windows are accented with stationary shutters. It rests on a concrete foundation.

Henry Clock was an attorney and an outstanding leader in Long Beach. He was born in Iowa in 1908. Two years after his birth, his father, Ralph H. Clock, moved the family to Long Beach and started the legal firm of Clock, McWhinney and Clock, one of the oldest in Long Beach. Henry attended Stanford and Southwestern Law School. In 1932 he married Frances Terry, daughter of a prominent surgeon, Roy A. Terry. He joined his father's firm, which shortly became Clock, Waestman and Clock, upon Mr. McWhinney's retirement. He served as a member of the National Boys Club of America and was past president of the Boys Club of Long Beach and received the Golden Boy Award in 1960. He also served as president of the Long Beach Area Boy Scouts of America; the Avalon Tuna Club; the Memorial Hospital Medical Center, and served on the Board for the Long Beach Bar Association for many years. He was a member of the American Bar Association and the State Bar Association of California; the American College of Probate Counsel and founder of the Lincoln Club. Henry Clock died in 1976.

16.52.200 The Artaban Apartments.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: The Artaban Apartments.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 10 Atlantic Avenue and constructed in 1922, this building is a very good example of a large scale apartment building from the I920/1930 era. As was common at this time in Long Beach, this building was built as cooperative apartments and included such amenities as a built-in refrigeration plant, laundry room, meeting and game rooms. The exterior of the building is concrete with many decorative touches added. There is a decorated band between the second and third floors and plain bands between each of the remaining floors. These bands are on the south and west sides of the building. The south side of the building features balconies under the center windows on the second through eighth floors and two side balconies on the seventh floor, all these balconies face the ocean. On the west side are two individual balconies on the fifth and seventh floors. Although the roof is flat, a decorative band running atop the south and west sides of the building simulates an overhanging roof. The entrance to this building is on the west side and is surrounded by a decorative arch and the recessed doorway is surrounded by a very decorated entrance. The lobby of the building is very beautiful and well maintained, the ceiling is a very colorful fresco with many details. The mantle around the fireplace shows scenes of Artaban travelers looking for Jesus.


16.52.210 The Broadlind Hotel.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historic landmark in the city: The Broadlind Hotel.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 149 Linden Avenue on the southwest corner of the intersection of Broadway and Linden Avenues (hence the name Broadlind) in Long Beach, the Broadlind Hotel is square in plan and four stories in height. A twenty by twenty foot penthouse at the northeast corner gives the impression that the building has a tower. The penthouse has a tiled, hipped roof. The low pitched roofs on the north and east sides are also tiled. The penthouse windows on the street sides are arched and six in number, with larger arches over each pair. A long shelf gives the appearance of support for the windows. The building has arched street level windows, two stories high. These arches are set on square marble columns with Corinthian capitals; these are connected with a braid which reaches from capital to capital. Other decorative features abound.

The Broadlind Hotel is an excellent example of Italian Renaissance architecture which is rare in the city of Long Beach. It was intended to cater to male transients and as such was furnished extensively in a way believed to appeal to masculine tastes - heavy furniture featuring a Spanish motif.

16.52.220 The Masonic Temple.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Masonic Temple.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 228-234 Pine Avenue, the Masonic Temple is a three-story, rectangular brick building that occupies its entire lot. At the top of the roof line, it is decorated by three gables. These give the building its Romanesque look with Gothic influences. Behind the gables is a mansard roof. Also on the front of the building is a block with "Masonic Temple" written in it.

The ground floor of the building is used for retail stores and various tenants have redecorated the facade. The top two stories in the front were constructed to house offices. The back of the top two stories is the location of the lodge hall.

The Masonic Temple is among the oldest buildings remaining unchanged in downtown. It may be the only remaining building in Long Beach designed by Henry F. Starbuck who designed many other early resort, commercial and residential buildings in downtown Long Beach. He also designed buildings in other cities throughout California. This building is Long Beach's oldest building constructed especially for Masonic lodge activities and it was the home of its oldest Masonic lodge. Among its members were many local citizens who made important contributions to the development of Long Beach.

16.52.230 The Matlock House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Matlock House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 1560 Ramillo, this single family residence was designed by architect Richard J. Neutra. The eight-room house plus three-car garage is of wood frame and stucco construction. Building regulations dictated the use of pitched roofs. The pitch is a low one and the materials are cedar wood shingles with redwood eaves. There are high banded windows along the front and side of the house and large, window walls facing onto the pool and garden area in the back. This allows space to flow visually between the primary living areas and the garden areas. The carport on the north side of the house seems to be a part of the house. The front door is protected from the public areas of street and sidewalk by an integrated landscaping plan that seems to be a part of the house.

The house was built by Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Matlock after they had seen the Neutra house of Dr. Grant Beckstrand. The Matlocks had many meetings with Mr. Neutra so that he could learn about their lifestyle and interpret the needs and desires of their family. They felt he was very thorough in these discussions. Neutra personally supervised the construction of the house, coming to Long Beach to be on site about once a week. He was instrumental in seeing that the landscaping was done to be in harmony with the architecture of the house.

The house was purchased in 1968 by the Matlocks' daughter and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Masterson, who have been careful to keep the integrity of the architecture in mind in any additions they have made.

16.52.240 The Moore House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Moore House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 5551 La Pasada, this single family residence was designed by architect Richard J. Neutra. The six-room, one-story house of wood frame and stucco construction was built in 1952-53 for the Bethuel Moore family. It is a complement to the neighboring home at 5561 La Pasada, and was designed this way by the architect for the purpose of presenting an integrated architectural appearance. Building regulations dictated the use of pitched roofs. The pitch is low and the materials are cedar wood shingles with redwood eaves. The redwood used in the garage door and inconspicuous side "front" door and as a structural definition under the cave in the front of the house contrasts beautifully with the smooth white stucco of the house. High banded windows and movable glass wall sections are significant features of the house. The private front patio and garden become a part of the interior of the house when the glass walls are slid open. This sharing of interior-exterior space is a special part of Mr. Neutra's designs. The front, redwood loggia covers the walkway to 5551 as well as 5561 La Pasada and seems to be a part of the two houses.

Doris and Bethuel Moore moved into the residence in June 1953. Bethuel, in his 40's, was a successful portrait painter and the den was designed as his studio. Doris was the owner of a seamstress shop and the originator of the Hang 10 insignia that graces millions of dollars of surfing and casual wear. Their daughter, Diane, was nine years old. The construction costs were $27,000 plus a ten percent architect's fee. In 1968, following the death of Mr. Moore by a heart attack, the home was purchased for $50,000 by Dr. Evelyn Blackman, a sociology professor at California State University, Long Beach. The home was sold in 1971 to Terry and Janice Atzen for $52,000. Terry, a stockbroker in his 30's, and Janice, a public relations director, were the parents of Jennifer, 7, and Jonathan, 5. The den was then used as a third bedroom with bifold doors added. In 1981, the house was refurbished. With the exception of the peninsula counter dividing the kitchen from the living room, there were no significant architectural changes.

The bathrooms were updated and some contemporary light fixtures installed. The glass in the living room sliding doors was replaced with gray glass and the tracks refitted. In the kitchen, the painted wood cupboards were refitted with new doors of veneered koa wood to match the original oven and portable bar. The twin residences are pictured or written about in several books on Neutra. They are Richard Neutra: Building and Projects, 1959, edited by W. Boesinger; Richard Neutra, by Rupert Spade; and Richard Neutra and the Search for Modern Architecture, by Thomas S. Hines. See a public library built by Richard Neutra's son, Dion in Huntington Beach.

16.52.250 The Olan Hafley House.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Olan Hafley House.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Located at 5561 La Pasada, this single family residence was designed by architect Richard J. Neutra. The five-room, one-story with a second story over the garage, is of wood frame and stucco construction. It was built in 1952-53 at the same time as the adjacent home at 5551 La Pasada. The two homes appear to be twin homes. They were designed this way for the purpose of presenting an integrated architectural appearance. Building regulations dictated the use of pitched roofs, and in the Hafley House (5561 La Pasada) the roof timbers are left exposed internally in natural redwood. Sliding glass doors allow space to flow visually between the living room and the garden. Generally open-planned, the house also has an upper story in the form of a bedroom over the garage. There is an inconspicuous front door at the side of the house and a common entrance passage of redwood loggia arching the front walks for both 5551 and 5561 La Pasada. The back yards for the two homes are also perceived as one continuous yard, as there is no fence separating them. The smooth white stucco and the redwood timbers and high banded windows are also significant features of the home.

Mr. Hafley first heard of Mr. Neutra from a high school civics teacher in Du Quoin, Illinois, in approximately 1934, when the teacher quoted from a Time magazine article on a young up and coming Los Angeles architect that "designed the only homes fit for man to live in." In 1951, when the Hafleys decided to build a house, Mr. Neutra was interviewed and commissioned. Meeting with Mr. Neutra at least twice a month during the planning period, they reviewed their daily tasks, interests and entertainment styles. Interested in designing a unified look with the neighboring homes, he asked the Hafleys to contact the owners of the properties adjacent to their site. The Bethuel Moores, original owners of 5551, were interested. The two homes were built at the same time. The homes reflect Mr. Neutra's philosophy of poetic imagery: "I try to make a house like a flower pot in which you can root something and out of which family life will bloom. It's not so much a question of ornamenting the flower pot as of fabricating it in such a way that something healthy and beautiful can grow in and out of it." Quoted from an article in the Los Angeles Times, Part VI, Sunday, March 13, 1977.

16.52.260 The Willmore Building.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following building as an historical landmark in the city: The Willmore Building.

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. Willmore was built in 1925. From its completion until 1952 it was a residential hotel, eleven stories in height, which offered vacationing easterners winter accommodations and access to the warm, sunny beaches of Southern California. The L-shaped tower contains traditional hotel rooms, one- and two-room apartments with kitchens, and a tenth-floor luxury penthouse. On the ground floor there is a large lobby; the solarium occupies the eleventh floor. The Willmore became an own-your-own building in 1952.

Architects in the early twentieth century were confronted with a major dilemma when designing buildings in classical style: How could they use the historical forms originally meant for one- to three-story public and religious buildings in the tall modern structures meant for contemporary functions? The Willmore offers an example of the solution: A careful copying of a fifteenth century Italian palace, with the middle heightened to accommodate the required stories.

The first two floors of the Willmore tower serve as the palace base, with the heavy stone foundation - quoining - and large windows terminated by the molding above the second floor windows. The third through the eleventh floors are the body of the palace, relatively devoid of ornament to strongly state the height of the building. At the top there is an implied entablature and cornice at the parapet wall. Here, in plaster, the cornice ledge is held up by braces fastened with three bronze rivets. Befitting a palace, surfaces between the braces are decorated with shields and fleur-de-lis above a hound's tooth border.

The colonnade, an attractive feature of Italian architecture, is used at the lobby entrance and again at the solarium at the top of the building. The lobby colonnade is in actual scale and gives an accurate replication of an Italian building. Featured are a tiled plaza, a fountain with mosaic decoration, and arched openings into the base of the tower. At the top is a smaller scale colonnade repeated as windows and balcony for the solarium.

Italian palace ornamentation is used on the friezes at the base and lower molding, typical balconies at the third and seventh floors, and on the complex cornice at the top of the tower. The required mechanical enclosures on the roof are housed in a replication of a typical Italian village - small white houses randomly ordered with small windows and rustic tile roofs.

Palace scale ornaments and furniture are used inside the lobby and faithfully preserved to this day. The terrazzo floor, a priceless example of 1920's craftsmanship, is black and white squares set diagonally to the building grid - a hallmark of Italian style. Balconied windows and a grand fireplace with a black onyx facing reinforce the style. The ceiling of a palace is reproduced in plaster and decorated in colors typical of Mediterranean style during the Renaissance. At the center of the lobby is a huge amber glass skylight which floods the room with light during the day. Residential rooms are finished in generous wall base molding, clean wall surface, and well detailed trim at the ceiling.

In summary, the Willmore is a significant architectural landmark because it is a good representation of Italian Renaissance palace style, it is rich in palatial detailing, and it is a well preserved example of a luxury residential hotel in Long Beach in the 1920's.

16.52.270 The Lafayette Complex.

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 2.63 and with the recommendation of the planning commission, the city council designates the following buildings as an historical landmark in the city: The Lafayette Complex, consisting of:

A. Location, Description and Reasons for Designation. 1. Constructed in 1929, the Lafayette Hotel, located at 140 Linden Avenue, is rectangular in plan and consists of one structure. The roof is flat, and each building has two recessed floors at the top. Above the second story on the shorter structure there are extremely ornate swag designs and zig-zag patterns, while the seventh story has draping ornamentation between and above the windows. The windows are recessed vertically, and each window has a shelf.
2. The Lafayette Addition was added to the hotel in 1948 as an eight-story addition facing Broadway. There were one hundred rooms. The University Club used the top floor. The kitchen was enlarged, and there were additional banquet rooms and a large supper club which would accommodate three hundred and fifty persons. The architecture is South American style, and the building is constructed of reinforced concrete. The then-owner, R.E. Campbell, made an inspection tour of all major hotels in the United States before drafting his final plans. Mr. Campbell died during this project, and his children took over. Robert E. Campbell ran the hotel for four years. In February 1952 the complex was sold to Hilton. The three buildings (including the Campbell Apartments) were joined together. The Ivanhoe Room, the Fife and the Drum Room were opened. In 1968, Hilton turned the building over to Robert Campbell and Norma Campbell Craig. In 1969, the whole complex was converted to condominiums. The property covers 41,000 square feet of ground. There are one hundred seventy-three residential units and forty-two commercial units, with a total of about 200,000 square feet of building space.

3. The Campbell Apartments, constructed in 1928, adjoin the Lafayette Hotel site. The eleven-story Spanish Renaissance building is typical of Southern California architecture of the 1920s. It has scroll and swag decorations beginning at the second floor and pyramiding up to the fourth floor. There is an ornamental balcony on the ninth floor. The central openings are bell-cast in shape and flanked by two windows on each side, very symmetrical in design.
Built by Reginald Campbell, The Campbell Apartments, Campbell, were deluxe apartments with hotel service. Every apartment had its own kitchen, and maid service was available. It provided a garage in the basement, and cars were kept polished by garage attendants. The Lafayette Hotel was bought by Reginald Campbell to protect the Campbell Apartments.

The exterior embellishments give this building an outstanding facade of modern architecture. It preceded Art Deco.

The land for the Campbell Apartments was acquired from the Southern Pacific Railway Company by the Broadway Land Company. The completion of the project marked the first major step of an important new business district. The Campbell's eleven stories complied with the Long Beach height limitation in 1928 and gave the skyline of Long Beach a cosmopolitan aura.

The Lafayette Complex occupies a prominent and desirable location in Long Beach. The property covers 41,000 square feet of ground space and it is visible from a large area.

Source: City of Long Beach http://www.ci.long-beach.ca.us/
 
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